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· May, 2008

Stories about Indigenous from May, 2008

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Brazil: Visible and Invisible Indians and Scoops

  31 May 2008

Brazilian Indians were in the spotlight of world media this week. From the images of an uncontacted tribe in the Amazon, to the enraged protest caught on camera against the building of dams along the Xingu River in the Amazon basin where an official of Brazil’s national electric company got slashed by traditional machetes and clubs.

Brazil: Struggling to deliver the deeper messages

  30 May 2008

“It's incredibly interesting to see how differently the same event can be reported. That was certainly the case last week when the Indians gathered to protest the building of dams along the Xingu River in the Amazon basin”. Lou Gold takes a look at the Brazilian mainstream media and compares...

Brazil: Images of the ‘Invisible Indians’ in the Amazon

  23 May 2008

Altino Machado presents pictures [PT] of what could be the last isolated ethnic group in the Brazilian Amazon rainforest, the so called ‘Invisible Indians’. The pictures were taken from a plane by José Carlos dos Reis Meirelles Jr., coordinator of FUNAI's [Brazilian National Indian Foundation] Ethno-environmental Protection Front, in the...

Paraguay: Mass Celebrated in Guaraní

  19 May 2008

Guillermo Verdún of Paraguayo [es] presents photographs of a mass in Asunción, Paraguay, which was celebrated in the indigenous language of Guaraní. The service was celebrated with the participation of various choirs and orchestras.

Blog for Palestine Day

Blogger za3tar has organized Blog About Palestine Day for today, May 15, the anniversary of the Nakba and Israel's 60th anniversary celebrations. Bloggers around the world were invited to blog for Palestine, as noted by Global Voices here. Many bloggers chose to participate in the event; here is a selection.

Lebanon: “Revolverism”

“Firing weapons in the air is a local custom rooted in tradition and history and nurtured by more than a century of frivolity and inter-communal love,” states Ms. Tee, while posting a 99-year-old report written by the British Consul General in Beirut at the time.

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