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South East Asian Blog Roundup

Singapore
Steven McDermott of Singabloodypore highlights a gathering for Shanmugam Murugesu, a Singaporean whose appeal for clemency from capital punishment has been rejected by Singaporean President. The blog entry has so far garnered 50 comments. He also writes about the Singaporean student who was forced to shut down his blog, threatened with libel proceedings.

Malaysia
Blogger Jeff Ooi strongly criticised Malaysian mainstream media for unneccesarily politicking education, and landing a Malaysian Minister in the unenviable position of having to explain himself to the Prime Minister. The thing about this issue is, as Jeff points out,

That said, theSun concludes by Keng Yaik meant well and his speaking out should be seen as the action of a nationalist.

No people of sound mind should differ.

Jeff”s entry about baby-fingerprinting has also got his commentors some global attention of their own.

Malaysian bloggers are still fighting for the disabled to be given better focus in disaster evacuation. The story has gotten global attention, with a premier French language blog, Pointblog, a magazine of blogging, giving it attention in their blog roundup.

blogdemand.png

The banner has so far gone up in 26 Malaysian blogs, and the number is rising. It is also supported by a blog by a medical professional.

StuffyMOH, a blog about the Malaysian Ministry of Health has highlighted an issue about growing resentment at the promotion of a retired civil servant to the top civil post.

Indonesia
Once upon a weblog questions if the fuss over rock group Dewa commiting blasphemy (in the eyes of Islam Defenders Front-FPI) is senitivity or over-reaction. Is it supression of freedom of speech, in terms of perfoming arts. The twist,

The controversy takes an interesting turn when some ulama, including Quraish Shihab and Gus Dur say that the group didn't commit blasphemy. Later on, National Council of Ulama (MUI) that acts as a mediator in this case declares that using the calligraphy of Allah for commercial purpose is permissible.

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