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Onnik Krikorian · November, 2010

Onnik Krikorian is a British journalist and photojournalist who has been resident in the Republic of Armenia since 1998. He also works extensively in Georgia and until moving to Armenia worked on the Kurds in Turkey since 1997 and the conflict in Nagorno Karabakh since 1994.
    
He has worked contracts at The Bristol Evening Post, The Independent, and The Economist in the U.K., and his articles and photographs have been published by The Los Angeles Times, New Internationalist, The Scotsman, Transitions Online, Middle East Insight, Oneworld.net, EurasiaNet, The Institute for War & Peace Reporting, New York University Press, UNICEF, and Amnesty International, among others.

Krikorian also regularly fixes for Al Jazeera English, the BBC and The Wall Street Journal. He maintains a blog from Armenia and the South Caucasus at http://blog.oneworld.am and also posts for the London-based Frontline Club at http://frontlineclub.com/blogs/onnikkrikorian.

Last year he started a personal project using new and social media in order to assist in Armenia-Azerbaijan conflict resolution at http://www.oneworld.am/diversity/. He also regularly presents on this topic at conferences worldwide. His personal web site is at http://www.oneworld.am.
   

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Latest posts by Onnik Krikorian from November, 2010

Georgia: Gypsies from Azerbaijan

  27 November 2010

Ulviya's Blog reports on the plight of gypsies begging on the streets of Tbilisi, the Georgian capital. The blog notes that most of them come from Azerbaijan and offers a brief glimpse into their lives.

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Armenia-Azerbaijan: Does culture unite or divide?

  25 November 2010

With a recent survey indicating that the majority of Armenians and Azerbaijanis are against mutual friendship, hopes for peace between the two neighboring countries appear very bleak indeed. Recent developments, including in the sphere of culture, appear to support that notion, but is there any hope?

Azerbaijan: Turkish memoir allegations

  25 November 2010

The Önər Blog [AZ] summarizes and comments on some of the allegations made against Azerbaijan's former president and Soviet-era boss in a new book of memoirs by a Turkish Embassy Press Attaché in the oil-rich country. The blog also posts an English translation.

Armenia: Police crackdown on ‘Emos’

  19 November 2010

Unzipped comments on news reports that the Armenian police are targeting teenagers who look different than what is expected in the still somewhat conservative and traditional former Soviet republic. The blog describes the methods employed by the police as “Stalinist,” but takes solace in the fact that some local bloggers...

Azerbaijan: Second video blogging youth activist released

  19 November 2010

Following yesterday's surprise news that video blogging youth activist Adnan Hajizade had been conditionally released from prison in Azerbaijan, Emin Milli, a friend and associate of Hajizada arrested and imprisoned at the same time last year, was also freed today. Threatened Voices has updated its status page accordingly.

Azerbaijan: Video blogging youth activist released

  18 November 2010

Threatened Voices has changed the status and updated the profile page of video blogging youth activist Adnan Hajizade following news that an Appeal Court in Azerbaijan ordered his conditional release earlier today after 16 months in detention. Despite significant international outcry, however, Emin Milli, an associate of Hajizade arrested at...

Azerbaijan: YAPistan

  8 November 2010

Jafarova's blog [AZ] comments on the results of yesterday's parliamentary elections held in Azerbaijan which saw the ruling YAP party consolidate its grip on power in the oil-rich former Soviet republic. Considering the parliament as simply a body to rubber stamp decisions from the President's Office, the blog says that...

Armenia: Digital Democracy

  7 November 2010

Writing on Ararat, Global Voices author Simon Maghakyan, sponsor of a recent online petition demanding the passage of legislation against domestic violence in his native Armenia, comments on the increasing use of new and social media by activists in the former Soviet republic.

Armenia: Iranian Embassy Protest

  4 November 2010

Unzipped posts video and photographs of today's protest outside the Iranian Embassy in Yerevan, the Armenian capital, in support of Sakineh Mohammadi Ashtiani, sentenced to death in Iran for infidelity. Commenting on the reaction of the Embassy, the blog opines that the Iranian Ambassador does not understand the concept of...

Azerbaijan: The media, religion & secularism

  4 November 2010

The Önər Blog [AZ] comments on calls by the Iranian Ambassador in Azerbaijan, as well as some religious citizens, to close down the ALMA newspaper after it was critical of the prophet Muhammad. The blog says that religion runs counter to democracy and freedom of expression, especially in a secular...

Azerbaijan: Defaced election posters

  3 November 2010

With the 7 November parliamentary election just four days away, Dadashov's Blog [AZ] posts a slideshow of images showing defaced election posters on one street in Baku, the Azerbaijani capital. The blog sarcastically notes that only the post of one candidate, the Rector of Baku State University running for the...

Onnik Krikorian's space

Personal Blog
http://blog.oneworld.am

Onnik Krikorian at the Frontline Club
http://frontlineclub.com/blogs/onnikkrikorian

Caucasus Conflict Voices
http://www.oneworld.am/diversity/

His personal web site is at http://www.oneworld.am.


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