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Thais in a Crowded Community Are Playing in the ‘World’s First’ Non-Rectangular Football Field

A non-rectangular football field in Khlong Toei, Bangkok. Source: YouTube

A non-rectangular football field in Khlong Toei, Bangkok. Source: YouTube

A non-rectangular football field? Well, if there’s no available space, why not?

A Thai property developer conceptualized the ‘unusual’ football field project as a solution to the lack of sports facilities in a densely populated community in central Bangkok, the capital of Thailand.

The AP Thailand company developed a non-rectangular football field in Khlong Toei, a working-class district near a port facility. This is reportedly the world’s first non-rectangular football field.

The company hopes that through the playing of football, which is a popular game in the country, residents of Khlong Toei will form a stronger bond. It also aims to inspire Thais to rethink and develop the unused spaces in their communities:

This unusual football field has proven that designing outside boundaries can help foster creativity used to develop these useful spaces.

We hope that other communities will adapt this idea to change their own irregular space into an area for organizing various activities, under the concept that “Any abnormal space can achieve the highest benefit.”

An unusual football field in Bangkok. Source: YouTube

An unusual football field in Bangkok. Source: YouTube

Today, kids of Khlong Toei do not need to go far in order to play football. By providing an opportunity for the youth to interact through sports and by converting an idle space into a valuable community property, this project can serve as a model for other initiatives that seek to revive and improve the quality of living in populated urban centers.

Learn more about the project through this video developed by CJ Worx, a digital agency film.

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