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Iran: Hope, Joy, Envy as Egypt Breaks Free

Iranian bloggers welcomed the departure of Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak today with both joy and envy. It is an amazing coincidence that Mubarak was brought down on exactly the 32th anniversary of the 1979 revolution when the Shah was overthrown.

Some bloggers also use the occasion to remind readers that the Green Movement is calling for demonstrations on Monday, February 14 in the name of Egypt and Tunisia.

Mamlkate Darim? (means ‘What country?’) writes :

Egyptians slept for 18 days in the streets and now they rejoice. We, Iranians, have slept for 32 years [referring to 1979 revolution]..what country do we have?

Sedaye Zendani (means ‘Voice of prisoner’) says [fa]:

Egyptian people got their rights. We will go on Monday, 25 Bahman [February 14] to the streets and celebrate for you. We were supposed to get the same right as the Egyptian people, but they were smarter and got it sooner than us. Now we must go to the streets to demand our rights, and celebrate the will of this nation for victory. To celebrate the victory of a nation, we need neither a leader nor permission.

Mihanparast (means ‘Patriot’) writes [fa] with irony, “Why did Mubarak have to leave now, he could have waited two days and left with Seyed Ali [Ayatholah Khamenei].”

Rag be Rag congratulates[fa] Egyptian brothers and sisters and says, the key to victory is keeping religion and state separated.

Greenlights writes [fa] that for all the blood spilled on the ground he will take part in the 14 February demonstration.

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