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Honduras: An Introduction to Honduran Blogs – Part 1

Editor's Note: We welcome Aaron Ortiz as our newest contributor to Global Voices Online. This is his first article, in which he provides an introduction to the Honduran blogosphere. He blogs regularly at Pensieve, an outstanding bridge blog written from the capital city of Tegucigalpa.

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Photo by Matthew Hogg and used under Creative Commons license.

The blog phenomenon has been slow to move to Honduras, but it's starting to take root. If you google “Honduras blogs” you'll find that 90% or more are not written in Honduras or by Hondurans. Most of them are written by people from the US. The few Hondurans who blog are usually in the computer science industry like myself, or in their teens.

One might venture to classify blogs written in Honduras into 4 broad categories:

* Expat blogs, written by people from the US

* Tech blogs, written by computer geeky Catrachos like your servant

* Personal blogs, written by young Hondurans

* High culture blogs, written by the Honduran intelligentsia

Notice that I didn't include travel blogs. That is because most travel bloggers blog not only in or about Honduras but everywhere in the world.

By far the expat blogs are the most abundant. Here are a few of them.

Expatriate blogs

La Gringa's blogicito (lagringasblogicito.blogspot.com) is one of the most widely read of these. It tells the tale of a gringa who moved to La Ceiba, Honduras in 2001. Her topics range from gardening to politics, and are full of practical wisdom and culture shock. Her easy-to-read style and sharp sense of humor has made her very popular among the expatriate community. She is vocal in calling for reform in Honduras, and for others to start blogging about the current issues in Honduran politics and society.

Little Wooden Man (www.littlewoodenman.com) tells the tale of a Canadian couple who move to the Honduran outback of Juticalpa, Olancho, and experience the surreal Honduran culture. Their blog is fresh and entertaining, but sometimes serious and philosophical. Many fellow bloggers and I have been drawn to its frank discussions of the pain of losing someone, religion, sexual harassment, wacky humor, and the “strange” customs and language of Honduran people.

Honduras Sprouts (hondurassprouts.blogspot.com) is the ongoing tale of another American lady who has just moved to Honduras a few months ago with her Honduran husband. Her pictures of her adorable family and tales of life in San Pedro make this blog a en excellent picture of expat family life. Topic include local critters, food quality, the fourth of July, and cutting the grass, Honduran-style.

Honduras living (hondurasliving.blogspot.com), by Don Godo, is another great blog, although entries are not as frequent as in the others I've mentioned. Nevertheless, where else would a future expat learn about health insurance, what beer to drink, or whether to try to build a house by “remote control”.

Hondubirding, (hondubirding.wordpress.com), by Daniel Germer. I'm not sure Daniel is from the States, his Spanish is that good, but his blog is written mainly in English. Daniel is a biologist, an aspiring naval officer, and as the title of his blog suggests, a fan of bird-watching. This site has some of the best pictures of the Honduran cloud forest that can be found on the internet.

By now there are more Honduran blogs than can fit into an article of comfortable length, so come again next time for a rundown of the abundant Honduran Tech blogs.

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