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Indonesia: One Day without TV

Can we live a day without TV? Many Indonesian bloggers almost simultaneously posted a piece about a day without television to commemorate National Children Day on July 23.

Many of them are worried about the quality of Indonesian tv programs which they see as a threat to the children creativity specially when it is seen from quality point of view.

Lita Mariana at Banana Talk, Priyadi, Triaji, Solyaris, and Bocah Cilik are among Indonesian bloggers who urge everyone to stop watching a tv program to pay respect for children and to warn Indonesian tv channels about their programs that could harm children in many ways.

This “one day without tv” campaign is initiated by Kidia a portal media dedicated specifically for children education.

Lita Mariana fully supports such campaign. As a mother of a couple of kids, she is very concerned with many tv programs that she thinks could pose a threat to the way the kids will behave in the future.

So what the point of making such campaign when they know that their voices will reach the deaf ears of Indonesian tv producers if it's not accompanied with a proper law? A comment here tell us the reason.

Says Rendy AK

It's not about anti-TV as a technology. It's just too-much-violence-and-junk-shows on (Indonesian) TV. This is not about proposing a bill that makes TV ilegal, just showing respect to the National Child Day.

As we all know Indonesian TV show is far from child-friendly. Despite that Indonesian children spend more time on TV than on other activities.

Masindi gives an interesting comment on Banana Talk post about how not watching tv can benefit you:

We have lived happily without TV since many years ago:

Read here: ” Celebrating Life at Home Without TV”

-We’ve read more books.
-We’ve entertained more guests (really, we had meaningful conversations and played musical instruments).
-We’ve copulated more often.
-We’ve tried more interesting recipes.
-Now, we’ve got all the time in the world to take care of Noe.

4 comments

  • Well, we in Sri Lanka almost had a week without “regular” TV. As our government introduced a new Tax on foriegn content on local TV, most of the local channels stopped telecasting regular entertainment programs! How ever, now two parties have come to a negotiation and we get normal TV schedules as usual.

    Actually, the concept introduced by Philiphines is very interesting. TV has influenced our daily interactions with other human beings to a greater extent. I guess this is a good initiative to build interpersonal relationships among familly members (and then with others in the society) which is very essential these days. People are pushed more and more towards being “individuals” rather than “social animals”. We have to turn back this trend, before our society turns into a Bararic culture once again, where individuals satisfy their personal needs, at any cost.

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  • […] Link: Indonesia: One Day without TV […]

  • my first baby, Darin, like to hear music and dance while the music run, but when she watch TV, eventually she just sitdown, stay watching without any word and have no movement. I think TV is not good, especially for toddler. I prefer to play with her in the yard instead watching TV in my house.

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