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Chilean citizens’ initiatives

Crime is on the increase. Citizens are tired. A victim of an armed robbery that occur two weeks ago in the capitol has started a social movement against the crime. In his first post (ES) , he puts forward a manifesto: “ My duty is not to legislate, I m not a parliament, to judge, I’m not a magistrate, to prosecute a criminal, I’m not a policeman, to look after the public, because I don’t work for the government”. He continues with a invitation to a peaceful demonstration(ES). He's had 561 comments on the post, most of them from people telling their own personal experience with crime and supporting his initiative.

Bloggers all over Chile have reacted to this concern. Consensus mauvicm (ES) describes the story of a woman who has been the victim of armed robbery 40 times in her house and who now sleeps with a gun. “Almost 50% of petty criminals spend less than a day in jail”.

Referring to the same issue, Cococita (ES) posts that

Incredible but true, in a country like Chile there exists something called the revolving door of justice, which means that judges release the most dangerous criminals who have been arrested, back into circulation for them to reoffend, again and again.

Patricio (ES) has analysed the first 100 days in power for President Michelle Bachelet. He touches on taxes, the bad manage of the students’ strike, and about crime he writes

Justice only acts in favor of the criminals (“innocent until proven guilty”, shouldn't this be in the other way around, in the case of the accused?).

Lately, several citizens’ initiatives have been emerging – the student strikes, a horn protest against the high price of petrol and a campaign to extend the tube schedule. Celicia (ES) writes about these cases in her blog. She remarks in her post “I don’t remember in the last years of the left wing government having so many citizens’ initiatives”.

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