Ayesha Saldanha · October, 2008

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Latest posts by Ayesha Saldanha from October, 2008

Israel: Desiring the Druze

  25 October 2008

Anglo-Arab blogger Doshka has decided that Druze men are ‘hot': “In Israel, they are quite possibly all first cousins because they can neither marry out of the sect, nor can outsiders convert to the Druze faith – meaning they have a very, very narrow gene pool. It's a very, very...

Palestine: No security

  25 October 2008

In Gaza, Sameh Habeeb talks to a young girl who witnessed her father and brothers being beaten by Israeli soldiers: “In all cultures the father of the family represents safety and security to the family. The Israeli soldiers routinely rob Palestinian fathers of their role.”

Saudi Arabia: Creating a modern mix

  25 October 2008

Saudi blogger Hala wonders about Canadian activist Irshad Manji, who is lesbian, feminist, and Muslim: “Some choose to create a modern mix of their original values and their new ones, thus reaching a comfort zone that can enable them to access both societies with agreeable levels, but how far can...

Bahrain: Naked truth?

  17 October 2008

Maldita, a Filipina in Bahrain, wonders why anyone uses automatic translators; instead of “You are not worth anything” she got the translation “You do not have clothes“…

Bahrain: Credit crunch explained

  11 October 2008

Bahraini blogger Evil Odd explains the credit crunch in simple terms: “There are three sheep in the farm. One carries inedible, infected meat. The other carries somewhat edible, but mostly tasteless meat. And the third carries what the rest of us know as good meat. The farmer realises that he...

Bahrain: The pleasures and perils of studying abroad

  11 October 2008

Although Bahrain has a number of universities, both government and private, many Bahrainis have the opportunity to go abroad to pursue undergraduate and postgraduate studies, often by means of scholarships. One of the first problems they face is that few people know where Bahrain is. In this post we hear about the experiences of three bloggers who have just gone abroad for higher studies, to Japan, Britain and the United States, and a fourth blogger who has been studying in India for some time.

Saudi Arabia: Business opportunity

Aysha Alkusayer has a suggestion for anyone looking to invest in Saudi Arabia: daycare. “Here’s what’s changing in Saudi. Young couples are moving away from their family’s house to wherever their jobs might be. If both mommy and daddy are working, comes the tough part of what to do with...

Saudi Arabia: Who polices the religious police?

Susie of Arabia writes about the Muttawa, or religious police, in Saudi Arabia and asks: “Who exactly is in charge of policing the Mutawwa here and how much are they getting away with beyond their authority? I know they are only human and they make mistakes, but many of their...

India: Attacks on Christians a challenge to the secular state

  7 October 2008

In the last two months, radical Hindu nationalist mobs have rioted and attacked Christians in a number of Indian states, claiming that lower-caste Hindus and tribal peoples are being forcibly converted to Christianity. More than 30 people have been killed, and thousands have taken shelter in government camps or in...

Palestine: Jerusalem blues

Vika, who lives in Jerusalem, lists the reasons why she is feeling despondent these days, including a recent realisation: “My mood hit rock bottom this month when I realised the reason for the loud and constant hammering and digging that has plagued us all summer…is the beginning of a wall...

Bahrain: Comedy without borders

Bahraini blogger Ammar, who runs the site Bahrain Talent, has just seen the Axis of Evil Comedy team perform in Bahrain – and was pleased that local comedians were able to hold their own on stage: “The act also introduced local talent; five comedians from Bahrain, unknown to most, but...

Palestine: Fatah and Hamas take their fight into schools

August 24 should have seen the start of classes for pupils in Gaza’s government schools, but instead it was the beginning of a week-long strike called by the Fatah-led teachers’ union protesting the interference of Hamas in education. In this post, one blogger, a school pupil himself, gives us his perspective on the political fight getting in the way of his education.

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