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Japan: Netizens react to the arrest of an Englishman

Japan Probe translated the comments [en] of some netizens who reacted to the arrest of an English man who grabbed “a mike from a politician at a train station and yelled about how Japanese elections are loud and annoying.”

2 comments

  • This is clearly a lack of cultural appreciation on the the part of the Brit. It is essential that before travel to a different part of the world, travellers should, at best, understand the new cultural environment and, at worst, tolerate it. The British always exclaim “foreigners” in undertones when people of foreign origin do something contrary to their cultural expectations. For me, I think that Brit deserves to be banged up.

  • bati

    Of course knowing something about the new culture before coming to the community is necessary.
    Apart from this, however, i can really nod to this guy. Who can judge the right person to entrust, being exposed to that a repetitive yelling of candidates names and such a loud unfocused speech in front of the busy morning station!? Jap election campaign is uber noisy and nonsense.
    We figured out that the normal objections can be turned down easily with the election law as far as it is, thanks to him. We should go thorough internet community, to make public opinions just like what is happening in other places on the globe now. This is because Jap people, tend to care about their reputation in the society first, much more politicians do.
    Whatever, I’m feeling embarrassed and shamed now as Japanese.

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