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Sri Lanka: A Georgia case?

Lanka Page opines that the recent incident in Georgia can be a lesson for Sri Lanka: “like in 1987, there is every likelihood that India will intervene if we too try a “Georgia.”

6 comments

  • We will never archive peace in this country or anywhere in the world unless we start thinking in the other persons view.

  • James

    Georgia has no relevance to Sri Lanka.

    Sri Lanka is a unitary state and has cancer by the name of LTTE terrorists.

    India, has well and truly learned the lesson …India will not come to the aid of LTTE terrorists again …LTTE terrorists killed Rajiv Gandhi and so many other innocent Indians.

    Sri Lanka will eradicate terrorism, which it is entitled to do.

  • Nimal

    Dear Rezvan, in your blissful ignorance of the Sri lanka situation, can’t you find a better thing to do rather than publicizing your ignorance and creating ripples among the ignorant.

  • Thanks everybody for your views.

    Nimal, in the spirit of freedom of speech we in Global Voices try to highlight different voices and opinions. The readers have the right to judge their merit and let the blog author(s) know. I see that you have not left any comment on that particular blog.

  • Rizwi

    Rezvan, …I think these matters are too much for your consideration …just think of spending time counting marbles …

  • Ha! How you rage personal attacks and spell my name tells a lot about you and your capabilities to consider. If you have different views please share them or send us links we will highlight that as well.

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