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Sudan: UN-AU Troops in Darfur, Ridiculously Expensive Nursery School, Wildlife Returning in South Sudan and Reactions Towards Sudanese Gay Blogger

It has been awhile since the previous round-up of the Sudanese blogosphere but I am now back with another one covering a variety of topics including angry reactions towards a new blog by a Sudanese gay.

Wholeheartedly-Sudaniya posted the following cartoon on the UN's slow response to Darfur and China's involvement:

The Sudanse Thinker shared his thoughts on the recent news of Sudan's acceptance of UN-AU troops in Darfur:

As for Sudan’s acceptance of UN-AU troops in Darfur, do not forget that it is conditional. There are demands that the force be fully comprised of soldiers from African countries and that it be under AU control. Those 2 things still need to be worked out. I wasn’t so excited when I first heard the news since I thought it was the old usual “let’s waste more time” tactic. I view things differently now. I’m actually quite ecstatic over the development but I’m just being a little cautious and I’d advise you to be too.

Amjad, a Sudanese blogger living in Oman tells us about Khartoum International Community School (KICS) and the ridiculously high price it charges for nursery school fees:

Imagine, the fees for nursery is about 17,840 New Sudanese Pound. $1 USD = 2.1 NSP, so let's divide that amount into 2.1. 17,840/2.1 = $8495 USD. What the heck? over $8000 USD for nursery school? lool .. Now let's see the fees for High School. For grades 10 and 11 the fees are 31,240 NSP which is about $15,000 USD. And for grades 12 and 13 is about $16,500 USD.

On a seperate issue, recently, some Sudanese have reacted angrily towards a new blog by a gay Sudanese named Ali. Here is an example of such reactions:

nigga go read a book or something damn, and quit that r'n'b sh*t you listenin to, im sure craig david got more influnce on you than anyone else and yeah, am homophopic you stupid f*ck lol

This is what Ali had to say:

Well, I'm Sudanese and Proud Gay Also. As far as I know I have all the rights to post and post whatever I want to as long as I'm not hurting anyone.

Meanwhile, Black Kush is not happy about a report that listed Sudan as the number one failed state in the world:

I find the recently published Failed States Index 2007 utterly unbelievable and rubbish. It is one of these publications that doesn't hold water. I have a lot of grievances with my country, but I don't consider it a failed state. For this am sure.

The Index puts Sudan at the top of the list, followed by Iraq and Somalia. Every sane man on the planet knows that there is no government in Somalia for the last ten years. Actually there was no STATE! And how will you describe the carnage raging in Iraq, with a hopelessly impotent American-backed government? It is in a state of civil war, a government that doesn't have control over its territories, etc.

…You can call Sudan what you want, but not failed: ask Somalis and Iraqis what they think first!

Last but not least, Black Kush also posted wonderful pictures of wildlife returning to South Sudan after 2 decades of a long bloody civil war:





2 comments

  • Drima:

    As always, you hold no punches man. It’s one of the reasons that I dig your style.

    Get this and please don’t laugh, but until recently I didn’t know that Sudan was actually a Sub Saharan country.

    But anyhow, back to your round up-thats utterly mind boggling how the wildlife knew that it was safe to return to Sudan and I agree with Black Kush-Sudan is not a failed state.

  • Thanks Benin, I appreciate your kind words. And please forgive me for not dropping by more on your blog. I’m having a one week break starting from today so I promise to catch up on whatever I missed.

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