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Echoes from the Tunisian blogosphere

The holy month of Ramadan started in Tunisia on Wednesday, October 5th. Now a Ramadan Tunisian blogger meetup is being organized.

Nostradamus publishes (in French) the program of the Tunis Medina festival that goes on from the 7th to the 29th of October. This festival takes place every year during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in the city of Tunis.

Imed writes about the Italian influence on the Tunisian spoken Arabic and gives examples of many words that come from the Italian language.

Karim takes us on a tour of the Sidi Al Bahry market in Tunis, and talks about the newly opened Mdjez Al Bab – Beja – Kef Highway.

Marwen writes about an article he read on the english website of Israeli newspaper Yedioth Ahronoth about Turkish and Tunisian ties with Israel. He thinks that all Arab and Muslim country should send out a clear message to Israel that ties won't be normalized until Palestinians get all their rights within a lasting peace solution.
On another note he writes about his ideas and thoughts on how to spread Wi-Fi internet in Tunisia.

Zizou from Djerba writes (in French)about his first Ramadan in Lebanon and how it's very different from Tunisia. He goes on about how nice and hospitable the Lebanese people he got to know are.

Houssein is amazed that Muslims whose civilization gave so much importance to science and astronomy, are up to this day still looking out for the crescent signaling the start of Ramadan using their naked eyes (in French).

Adib writes (in French) about the sold out Tunisia-Morocco World Cup qualifier match that will be taking place Saturday, October 8th in Tunisia. He wonders who will win, even though he personally expects it will be Tunisia's game.

1 comment

  • we are a champion!
    Tunisia in Germany 2006 world cup
    congratulation!

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