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Nicholas Laughlin · February, 2008

I'm a writer and editor with a particular interest in Caribbean literature and art. I was born in Port of Spain, Trinidad, and am still here. My book of poems, “The Strange Years of My Life”, was published in 2015.

I'm the editor of Caribbean Beat, a bimonthly magazine; co-director of the contemporary art space Alice Yard; and programme director for the Bocas Lit Fest.

I've also edited a collection of essays by C.L.R. James, “Letters from London” (2003), a revised and expanded edition of V.S. Naipaul's early family correspondence, “Letters Between a Father and Son” (2009), and an anthology of new writing from Commonwealth small island countries, “So Many Islands” (2018).

Find out more about me at my home page, nicholaslaughlin.net.

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Latest posts by Nicholas Laughlin from February, 2008

Guyana: Warning poem

Signifyin’ Guyana posts “the angels warn”, a poem by Guyanese writer Balwant Bhagwandin, and notes, “The recent history-making violence in Lusignan makes the warning prophetic and urgent.”

Jamaica: Staring at strangers

Does it seem that Jamaicans like to stare at strangers? Moving Back to Jamaica explains why that might be.

Barbados: Press pays attention to blogs

A leading Barbados newspaper runs an editorial on “The Blogging Phenomenon”; Living in Barbados offers an analysis of the coverage.

Trinidad and Tobago: Reading Andy Ganteaume

Jamaican writer Geoffrey Philp takes at look at the recently published memoirs of Trinidadian cricketer Andy Ganteaume — who scored a century in his one and only Test match, 60...

Trinidad and Tobago: Carnival art

Trinidad's art galleries are filled with Carnival-themed work right now, says SexyPink, but is it just aimed at tourist dollars? “We have to reach inside ourselves and pull out much...

Barbados: Police ignoring drug dealers?

Barbados police go after drug users, including tourists, but ignore the dealers, says Barbados Free Press. Why?

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