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Australia Takes Cricket World Cup in Tame Final Match With New Zealand

The battle for the World Cup of Cricket is in full swing

The battle for the World Cup of Cricket is in full swing
Courtesy Flickr user Percita (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Australia has triumphed in the final of the Cricket World Cup 2015. After bowling out tournament co-hosts New Zealand for 183, the Aussies reached the target in 33.1 overs for the loss of just three wickets. The game was played at the Melbourne Cricket Ground in front of crowd of 93,013.

Pakistan fan Ali captured the feelings of many cricket followers about the result:

Australian fast bowler Mitchell Starc was a popular winner as best player of the World Cup contest:

It was Michael Clarke’s last game as Australian captain of the One Day International team who compete in the 50 over competition. Fittingly, he was his side’s highest scorer with 74.

Clarke dedicated the win to Philip Hughes, his teammate and friend who was killed in a cricket accident last year.

The Kiwi captain Brendon McCullum was hailed on Twitter for his leadership and contribution throughout the tournament.

Cricket World Cup 2015 Final

Cricket World Cup 2015 Final – Courtesy Flickr user Tourism Victoria (CC BY 2.0)

There were sour moments when Australia’s wicketkeeper Brad Haddin was criticised for sledging (insulting a player from the opposing team). Many tweets contrasted the sporting spirits of the two teams:

Another concern centred around the blending of alcohol, advertising and sport:

Controversial cricketing icon and commentator, former Australian spin bowler Shane Warne, copped criticism for his post-match call for drinks:

Warnie was not put off by his critics:

Many were disappointed that the game was not closer and more exciting:

But the social media verdict on the whole tournament was clear (complete with misspelling):

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