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Scilla Alecci · May, 2011

Italian living in Tokyo, between March 2009 and September 2011 I was the Japanese language co-editor for Global Voices with Tomomi Sasaki.

 

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Latest posts by Scilla Alecci from May, 2011

Japan: Video Haiku

  23 May 2011

Vimeo user Stephen Niebauer presents a project called Video Haiku. A haiku is a short form of Japanese poetry that usually consists of three verses of 5,7 and 5 morae. “So, for this project, your video structure should be like this: 5 second shot, 7 second shot, 5 second shot.”

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Japan: Aiding the Aid Workers

  22 May 2011

After more than two months from the earthquake around 110,000 people are still living in evacuation centers. Along with victims of the disaster, some of the volunteers, doctors and aid workers helping them are beginning to suffer from emotional stress and fatigue.

Japan: No Nuke Art

  15 May 2011

A group of anti-nuclear activists started No Nuke Posters [en], a project “for a post-nuclear future and for those working to rebuild amid Japan's nuclear crisis”. They accept submissions of original artworks [en] that will be published on the website under Creative Commons license (by-nc-sa).

Japan: Holiday in Fukushima

  9 May 2011

The author of Spike Japan decided to spend last week's national holidays in the Fukushima prefecture. In his latest post he chronicles his journey [en] to the tsunami hit area and its surroundings.

Japan: Manga artist's Smiles

  6 May 2011

Popular manga artist Takehiko Inoue has been publishing original portraits of Japanese people through his twitter account @inouetake with the hashtags #prayforjapan and #tsunami. The series is called Smile.

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Japan: Sanka, Legendary Gypsies Living in the Wild

  5 May 2011

A documentary has recently revived interest in the existence of the 'Sanka', a group of people who are said to have lived in the remote mountains and plains of the Japanese archipelago until the 1970s. Some bloggers have speculated on the origins of these legendary nomads.

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