Renata Avila · May, 2008

Renata Avila, (Guatemalan), is an international Human Rights lawyer, specialising in the next wave of technological challenges to preserve and advance our rights, and better understand the politics of data and their implications on trade, democracy and society. She is an Affiliate with the Stanford Institute of Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence. She is an Advisory Board member for Creative Commons. She also serves as a Board Member of the Common Action Forum and a Global Trustee of the Think Tank Digital Future Society. She is an advisory member of the initiative Cities for Digital Rights. She co-founded the Alliance for Inclusive Algorithms, the Progressive International and the Polylateral Association, an international platform cooperative for knowledge workers. @avilarenata

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Latest posts by Renata Avila from May, 2008

Guatemala: Animal Del Monte Festival in Xela

  30 May 2008

Quetzaltenango or "Xela" was the site of an international poetry festival called Animal del Monte, which brought 40 poets from around Latin America. A big part of the festival was reaching out to surrounding communities by holding readings to local residents. The festival also highlighted the work of Guatemalan poets, who demonstrated that many fine works come from that country.

Notes From Berkman@10 Conference

  15 May 2008

At the celebration of the 10th anniversary of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society, attendees and special guests discussed “The Future of the Internet,” and its political dimensions and its affect on the global community. In addition, during the opening remarks there was an announcement that the Berkman Center will become a university-wide research center. GV author Renata Avila is attending the celebration and provides these notes.

Guatemala: Remembering Bishop Gerardi and His Report “Never Again!”

  6 May 2008

Ten years ago, Bishop Juan Gerardi released a report called “Guatemala, Never Again!,” which contained powerful testimonies of those forever affected by the armed conflict in Guatemala. The report provided graphic details and specific names of those who committed these crimes, and as a result, ultimately cost Bishop Gerardi his life. He was killed approximately 50 hours after the release of the report. A decade later, Guatemalan bloggers remember the man who brought much of what was happening in the war into the public consciousness.

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