Close

Support Global Voices

To stay independent, free, and sustainable, our community needs the help of friends and readers like you.

Donate now »

Nathan Hamm · October, 2006

The former Regional Editor for Central Asia & the Caucasus, I have now hung up my keyboard and moved on to emeritus status.

More of my blogging can be found at the oldest English language blog on Central Asia and Caucasus, Registan.net.

Email Nathan Hamm

Latest posts by Nathan Hamm from October, 2006

Kazakhstan: Astana's Two Sides

KZBlog notes that a couple articles on the the Palace of World Peace, a pyramid designed by UK architect Lord Foster, in Astana, the capital of Kazakhstan. Featured in these...

Armenia: Healthcare

Onnik Krikorian recounts some horror stories from the Armenian medical system, saying that seeking medical care in Armenia might be more dangerous than Russian roulette.

Kyrgyzstan: Joining the Russian Federation

Yulia of neweurasia notes that a Kyrgyz politician recently said that Kyrgyzstan should become part of the Russian Federation and she explains why this might make sense.

Kazakhstan: No Thanks!

Ben Paarmann notes that Kazakhstan's president has declined nomination for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Armenia: Foreigner Friendly

Blogrel applauds Yerevan for making itself more friendly to foreigners and tourists by putting up bilingual signs and maps.

Armenia: Yerevan Traffic

At ArmYouth Blog, Pradafreak complains about traffic and transportation in Yerevan.

Tajikistan: Why are you running?

At neweurasia, Vadim reports that Tajik presidential candidates are rather reluctant to take on the incumbent, leading him to conclude that they are indeed window dressing to make the election...

Kazakhstan: Electing Akims

KZBlog reports on local elections for executives in some parts of Kazakhstan, noting that some local media did not find the elections all that newsworthy.

Tajikistan: Energy & Tension with Uzbekistan

Alexander Sadikov explains how Tajikistan's plans to become an energy exporter are causing problems in relations with Uzbekistan.

Armenia: Kashatagh

Notes From Hareinik draws attention to the depopulation of Kashatagh, territory captured by Armenian during and settled by Armenians after the war between Azerbaijan and Armenia.

Tajikistan: Roundup

Vadim reports on the latest buzz in the Tajik blogosphere.

Kyrgyzstan: Demand for Reform

Yulia looks at the Civil Society Forum's demands to the Kyrgyz government for reforms and finds some commendable points. Ultimately though, she says, the fact that the group put their...

Kazakhstan: Borat, the Political Psychology

Sean Roberts explains the political psychology of the Borat-Kazakhstan relationship.

Turkmenistan: The Heart

Peter of neweurasia notes that Turkmenistan's president has publicly admitted that he has health problems and he discusses what this might mean for Turkmen politics.

Armenia: Notes from the Blogosphere

Onnik Krikorian rounds up the Armenian blogosphere.

Kazakhstan: Atyrau Violence

Leila rounds up some of the blogosphere discussion of the recent violence in Atyrau between Turkish and Kazakh workers.

Armenia: Critical Mass

At ArmYouth Blog, akhtamar reports on October 22nd's Critical Mass in Yerevan.

Uzbekistan: A New Tune?

At Registan.net, Bertrand reports that Uzbekistan's president is using a new explanation for last year's violence in Andijon and he discusses some of the possible explanations for this change.

Armenia: Burglaries

Life in Armenia blogger Raffi K. says that there sppears to be a large number of burglaries in Yerevan.

Kazakhstan: Brawl in Atyrau

A fight broke out between Turkish and Kazakh workers in Atyrau, Kazakhstan. The Atyrau Informant has photos and a brief report on what took place.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices!

Submitted addresses will be confirmed by email, and used only to keep you up to date about Global Voices and our mission. See our Privacy Policy for details.

Newsletter powered by Mailchimp (Privacy Policy and Terms).

* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site