Nathan Hamm · July, 2006

The former Regional Editor for Central Asia & the Caucasus, I have now hung up my keyboard and moved on to emeritus status.

More of my blogging can be found at the oldest English language blog on Central Asia and Caucasus, Registan.net.

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Latest posts by Nathan Hamm from July, 2006

Kyrgyzstan: Osh

Breed writes about the charms of the bazaar in the Kyrgyz city of Osh and the lessons it holds for those who might find themselves in post-Soviet airports.

Armenia: Apricot Republic

Irina Petrosian discusses the omnipresence of apricots, apricot-related gossip, apricots as an indicator of inflation, and much more that has contributed to Armenia being referred to on occasion as an “apricot republic.”

Kyrgyzstan: US to Stay

Yulia comments on the release of additional details about the new agreement between Kyrgyzstan and the United States that will allow the US to keep using the Manas airfield for supporting operations in Afghanistan. She argues that it is fortunate that the issue was resolved without becoming a huge fight...

Armenia: Racist Fliers

Nessuna reports on the appearance of racist fliers appearing in Yerevan urging people to “clean their city.” Onnik Krikorian adds that this is ironic considering the number of South Caucasus natives who have died at the hands of white supremacists in Russia.

Armenia: Our Duty to Live

Onnik Krikorian posts photos and and an interview with the program manager of the Our Duty to Live project in Vanadzor, Armenia. The project offers educational and social services to needy children in an area still recovering from the devastating 1988 earthquake.

Central Asia: Eurasian Islam

Ataman Rakim argues for a Eurasian Islam that would unite Muslims of the former Soviet Union under a common identity and serve not so much as a formal set of religious and political ideas but instead as a catalyst for social initiatives.

Uzbekistan: Happy Planet

Ben Paarmann reports on Uzbekistan's fairly high rank on the Happy Planet Index. He notes that Uzbekistan's score (as well as those of neighboring Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan) are not a result of government policies though.

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