Nathan Hamm · February, 2007

The former Regional Editor for Central Asia & the Caucasus, I have now hung up my keyboard and moved on to emeritus status.

More of my blogging can be found at the oldest English language blog on Central Asia and Caucasus, Registan.net.

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Latest posts by Nathan Hamm from February, 2007

Uzbekistan: Perils of Assisting Homosexuals

  28 February 2007

Registan.net covers the latest crackdown on foreign health NGOs in Uzbekistan, which includes action against an organization running an HIV/AIDS prevention program for not just paperwork problems but also because it works with homosexuals. Male homosexuality is a crime in Uzbekistan punishable by three years in prison.

Armenia: Self-immolation

  28 February 2007

In Armenia yesterday, a man died after setting himself on fire in the capital's Republic Square. It is not known exactly why the man set himself alight, but he reportedly was angry at government officials and over unspecified injustices. The CRD/TI Armenia Election Monitor reports on the incident and rounds...

Armenia: Protesting the Land Grab

  27 February 2007

The CRD/TI Armenia Election Monitor reports on a protest against Armenia's president that took place today outside of the presidential palace. The protesters are former residents of homes that the government evicted them from and for which the government paid less than market value.

Afghanistan: Heroes and Warlords

  27 February 2007

Afghanistanica, a new blog covering Afghanistan, looks at the role of public relations strategies in Ahmed Shah Masood being remembered as a hero and Rashid Dostum being considered a warlord. The difference, the blogger argues, is that the latter let his enemies define him, while the former used savvy spokesmen...

Uzbekistan: Plight of the Merchants

  27 February 2007

Registan.net discusses the plight of Uzbekistan's merchants. Despite recent changes that should make trade easier and more profitable, cross-border traders still face numerous difficulties as a result of police harassment and high taxes.

Tajikistan: Islam & Identity

  26 February 2007

Lola discusses what being Muslim means to Tajik identity and what cultural and religious practices make one sufficiently Muslim without being considered what many in Tajikistan consider a “fanatic.”

Kyrgyzstan: Paying for Grades

  26 February 2007

Tolkun Umaraliev explains the situations in which Kyrgyz students pay bribes to receive good grades. He says that it is horrible to think about what this widespread practice means for the future of Kyrgyzstan.

Uzbekistan: Mathematical Expression

  23 February 2007

Claire Wilkinson discusses a report showing that medieval Islamic art shows an understanding of complex geometry that did not find mathematical expression until fairly recently. The researcher first became interested in the subject while visiting Islamic structures in Uzbekistan.

Turkmenistan: Flurry of Activity

  23 February 2007

neweurasia reports on the flurry of personnel shuffling, diplomatic calls, and presidential edicts since Turkmenistan elected its new president, who, the post says, must shake things up in order to survive.

Kazakhstan: Environmental Buyout

  23 February 2007

Ben Paarmann says that ChevronTexaco has long had problems with accumulating sulfur deposits at its Tengiz oil field in Kazakhstan. So why is the government suddenly threatening to punish the company for environmental damage? Ben suggests that Kazakhstan's government may be trying to get more control over the project.

Tajikistan: Violet Revolt

  22 February 2007

Vadim notes that a new opposition party has appeared in Tajikistan, threatening to overthrow the president in a popular revolt if he does not resign by the spring. Vadim says that this is quite unlikely to find much support among Tajikistan's citizenry.

Armenia: A Real Alternative

  22 February 2007

The Armenian Libertarian-Socialist Movement blog notes the appearance of a new movement calling itself “The Alternative,” and examines whether or not the movement lives up to what it claims to be.

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