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Ndesanjo Macha · August, 2012

I am a blogger, journalist, lawyer, digital activist and new media consultant. I am interested in the relationship between social media and development in the developing world, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa.

I am the Sub-Saharan Africa Editor here at Global Voices. Follow me on Twitter: @ndesanjo

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Latest posts by Ndesanjo Macha from August, 2012

Africa: Innovation, Education and Nature

  12 August 2012

Mutua discusses education and innovation in Africa: “In today’s world it is imperative to create a differentiated and sophisticated economy in order to truly be competitive, so for African states to become significant players in the global economy, we have to find ways to move up the ladder to innovation-driven...

Ghana: Orphaned Orphans

  12 August 2012

Demeter blogs about the challenges of managing finances in the Non-Profit sector in Ghana: “I am in touch with Eric Gaetin, the boy who lost the use of his legs due to medical malpractice, whose father then pronounced him “cursed” and who kicked him out of his home and reduced...

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US, Equatorial Guinea: Rebranding an African Dictator

  11 August 2012

"This is equivalent of organising a conference on free speech in North Korea - then getting Kim Jong-un to cut the ribbon." US-based human rights group, the Sullivan Foundation is helping rebrand Equatorial Guinea's President Obiang, Africa's longest-serving dictator.

Africa: Africa Tumblrs to Follow

  4 August 2012

Here are Apostrophekola's top African photo tumblrs: “…I think you should be following if you have any interest in Africa. With these tumblrs, a picture is definitely worth a thousand words”

Africa: Post-feminism in Africa?

  4 August 2012

Simi Dosekun intends to blog about the concept of post-feminism in Africa: “My posts will cover my research interests: African feminism, how as African women we think of ourselves, media and popular culture, the dubious concept of post-feminism which I think is, ironically enough, infiltrating popular discourse in Africa.”

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