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Mahsa Alimardani · October, 2014

Mahsa Alimardani an Iranian-Canadian Internet researcher. Her focus is on the intersection of technology and human rights, especially as it pertains to freedom of expression and access to information inside Iran. She holds a Honours Bachelor of Arts and Science in Political Science from the University of Toronto, and has completed her Research Masters at the University of Amsterdam, researching the Iranian Internet. She's currently working on her DPhil at the Oxford Internet Institute at the University of Amsterdam, while working on Article 19's Iran digital programmes.

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Latest posts by Mahsa Alimardani from October, 2014

28 October 2014

Poignant YouTube Videos Give Voice to Ordinary Iranians

What are Iranians biggest fears? A filmmaker asked people in the streets of Tehran to find out.

22 October 2014

Iran's Conservative Media See a Reformist Plot in Coverage of Acid Attacks Against Women

Kayhan has accused reformist newspapers of publishing news related to the attacks in order to destroy the image of the "believers" and "supporters" of the Islamic regime.

8 October 2014

Iranians Join Protests in Support of Syria-Turkey Border Town Kobane, Beseiged by ISIS

Kobane has been under attack since mid-September by ISIS. The hashtags #TwitterKurds, #Kobani and #کوبانی have been trending on social media in support of the city.

6 October 2014

#FreeSaeed: An Iranian Web Developer's Sixth Year in Prison

Advox

Saeed Malekpour was originally sentenced to death as a "corrupter of the earth" for his open source software that others used to download pornographic images.

1 October 2014

Cute Cat Theory in Action: Despite Drought, Iranian Users Take the Ice Bucket Challenge

Are Iranians really more consumed by Facebook likes and online attention than they are with tangible problems within their own country? If so, they're not alone.