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Lova Rakotomalala · December, 2010

My area of interest is centered on francophone Africa, the status of minorities and immigrants in Europe & media biases. Raised in Madagascar, I hold a Master of Public Policy from Princeton University at the Woodrow Wilson School of International Affairs with a focus on international development & international relations and PhD in Medical Sciences from Purdue University. I can be found on twitter at twitter.com/lrakoto.

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Latest posts by Lova Rakotomalala from December, 2010

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Tunisia : “We Are Not Afraid Anymore!”

  31 December 2010

The year 2010 is coming to an end but Tunisia is shaken up by a social uprising that many bloggers hope will bring a decisive change in their country. Because of the Tunisian censorship of internet and the media, social media are heavily used to inform and organize the protests for 13 days now by using the hashtag #SidiBouzid. One main question stands out: Why are the protests in Tunisia not having the same echo as the protests in Iran? Additionally, why is censorship by China always discussed but the blackout by the police state of Tunisia never addressed?

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Tragedy bookends Year 2010 for Francophone Citizen Media

  26 December 2010

It appears that tragedy will bookend yet another year rich in remarkable events in the world of francophone citizen media. The month of January set the tone with the fallout from the earthquake in Haiti and December saw the elections in Cote d'Ivoire take a dramatic turn. Here is the year 2010 reviewed through the lenses of francophone citizen media users.

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Côte d'Ivoire: Anger and Sarcasm in Citizen Media after the Elections

  11 December 2010

After a hopeful start, the presidential elections in Cote d'Ivoire took a dramatic turn that led the country in a seemingly hopeless political stalemate. While the crisis persists, the Ivorian blogosphere seems to be split between either taking the events with a hint of humor and sarcasm or debating passionately the political and legal implications of the latest events. Julie Owono explains:

Lova Rakotomalala's space

Jeslyn Lemke, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Multimedia Journalism
Communication Department


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