Julie Owono · February, 2011

Cameroonian citizen living in Paris.
Holds a Postgraduate degree in International Law at the Sorbonne Law School, preparing the Bar exam. Aspiring lawyer, currently consultant in International Relations, interested in issues related to development and Governance in Africa, ICT4D.
Grew up in Moscow and worked at the International Organisation for Migration in Lao People's Democratic Republic.

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Latest posts by Julie Owono from February, 2011

France: Demonstration in Paris Against Gabon Dictatorship

  28 February 2011

Around 7,000 people gathered in the streets of French capital Paris to demonstrate against African dictators and the French government's alleged collusion with African dictatorial regimes on Saturday 26 February, 2011. Protestors chanted slogans outside Gabon President Ali Bongo's 140 million Euro mansion.

Côte d'Ivoire: Images of Vandalised Mosque in Yopougon

  28 February 2011

Ibrahim Diarra posted pictures of a mosque in Yopougon, Côte d'Ivoire which he says was vandalised on February 26 by President Laurent Gbagbo's Young Patriots. The photos appeared on the Facebook page, Pour la paix, rien que la paix en Côte d'Ivoire (“For peace, nothing but peace”). Côte d'Ivoire has...

Gabon: Leaderless Opposition?

  15 February 2011

Gabon is entering its third week of political tension, as its two presidents - official and unofficial - both claim leadership. But as developments continue in this small West African nation, critics denounce a lack of leadership in the burgeoning opposition movement.

Gabon: Students Protest, Army Deployed

  11 February 2011

Gabon's political crisis reached new heights on February 10, as students protested at Omar Bongo University in the capital city, Libreville. Whereas riots last week involved mainly the opposition, the confrontation appears to be developing into a wider social conflict.

Gabon: The Invisible Revolt

  4 February 2011

Protests in Gabon have failed to make a dent in the international news cycle as all eyes are still turned towards the Egyptian crisis. However, what was considered negligible protests before by Ali Bongo and his partisans seems to have created enough political turmoil to provoke the censorship of a television channel and repression of public protests.

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