See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

Jeremy Adam Smith

Jeremy Adam Smith edits the GGSC's online magazine, Greater Good, and helps launch new products like Thnx4.org and Greater Good in Action. He is the author of The Daddy Shift, which the San Francisco Chronicle calls “amazing” and the New York Times praises as “a chronicle of a time that he predicts we will look back upon as the start of permanent change.” He also co-edited the collection Rad Dad: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Fatherhood, as well as two Greater Good anthologies, Are We Born Racist? and The Compassionate Instinct.

Jeremy's coverage of racial and economic segregation in San Francisco schools has won numerous honors, most recently the 2014 Sigma Delta Chi Award for investigative reporting and John Swett Award from the California Teachers Association. His articles and essays have appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, Utne Reader, The Nation, Mindful, Shambhala Sun, Wired, CNN.com, and many other periodicals, websites, and books. Jeremy has also been interviewed by The Today Show, the New York Times, USA Today, Salon.com, Working Mother, Nightline, ABC News, NBC News, the Globe and Mail, and numerous NPR shows about parenting and education. Before joining the GGSC, Jeremy was a 2010-11 John S. Knight Journalism fellow at Stanford University.

Email Jeremy Adam Smith

Latest posts by Jeremy Adam Smith

8 July 2016

If I Had a Gun

The Bridge

"When I think about the times I've been attacked or threatened or I've seen violence, I can't think of one instance when a gun would have improved the outcome."

7 December 2015

To Solve Gun Violence, Americans Need to Aim Higher

The Bridge

"I’m angry over the shootings in so many other places, no matter what twisted, dehumanizing vision motivates them. But I also want to be true to myself and my values."

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site