John Kennedy · December, 2009

Former Chinese Language Editor for Global Voices Online, living in Hong Kong.

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Latest posts by John Kennedy from December, 2009

China: Three prominent bloggers GFWed in the same week

  30 December 2009

Following the blocking of veteran Internet essayist He Caitou's (@hecaitou) two longstanding blogs hecaitou.net and caobian.info on December 25, renowned columnist Lian Yue (@lianyue) had yet another one of his blogs, lianyue.net, blocked on the 29th; late on the evening of December 30, Peking University new media associate professor Hu...

China: Cui Weiping tweets elite views on Liu Xiaobo

  29 December 2009

Many Chinese public intellectuals take flack for keeping quiet on major social issues. Beijing Film Academy professor Cui Weiping has sought to change that by tweeting her peers' views on the recent sentencing of China's most prominent democrat.

China: Tweeting in support of Iran

  28 December 2009

Twenty-four hours later and #CN4Iran remains in heavy constant use by Chinese Twitter users speaking out in support of protests now underway across Iran. The #CN4Iran hashtag has since been joined by a @CN4Iran Twitter account and a central blog. Related is this post with a similar story from 2007.

China: ‘How did Copenhagen end up our fault?’

  26 December 2009

Did China do badly at Copenhagen? Writes one Chinese blogger: "I think Chinese officials acted splendidly at the Copenhagen summit; this was the first time for me to see China be bold like Americans in standing up tough for its own interests."

China: Pessimism, skepticism and concern over Copenhagen

  12 December 2009

A number of Chinese media and environmental groups have sent people to Copenhagen to cover the climate talks as well as protest; bloggers back home, meanwhile, don't seem too hopeful that leaders there will commit to meaningful action toward reducing carbon emissions.

China: The Internet situation in Xinjiang

  7 December 2009

“Today marks five long months,” writes Far West China blogger Josh Summers, since Xinjiang, China's largest province, was unplugged from the Internet. With answers to the questions many have been asking, Josh notes: “[w]hile any internet content, especially for English-speakers, is extremely limited, there is plenty still available to be...

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