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Andy Yee

Andy Yee is a technology policy expert. He is currently a Public Policy Director for Visa in Greater China, handling policy issues related to digital payments, economic growth and financial inclusion. Prior to Visa, he served for four years as a Public Policy Analyst for Google in Asia Pacific. This entailed internet policy issues including technology innovation, free expression, privacy and intellectual property. Earlier in his career, he has held permanent and visiting roles in public institutions and investment banks, including the Hong Kong Government, the European Union Delegation to China, UBS and Crédit Agricole.

He is a published author on politics, technology, and Asia. His works have appeared in academic and policy journals including the Journal of Current Chinese Affairs, Global Asia and Internet Policy Review, and the media including Nikkei Asian Review, South China Morning Post and Asia Sentinel. He was a regular contributor to citizen media Global Voices and China blog ChinaGeeks. To date, his writing has been mentioned by publications ​such as The New York Times, the Guardian and IMF magazine Finance & Development.

He holds master’s and bachelor’s degrees in Information Engineering from the University of Cambridge, and a master’s degree in Pacific Asian Studies from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. While at Cambridge, he spent a year on exchange at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He is a Financial Risk Manager (FRM) certified by the Global Association of Risk Professionals, and has completed the MIT Fintech: Future Commerce certificate course. He speaks Mandarin, English, Japanese and Cantonese.

(Last updated: October 2016. Website: ahkyee.com)

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Latest posts by Andy Yee

China: Outrage at High-Speed Train Crash

A collision between two high-speed trains in China in the evening of July 23 killed at least 35 people and injured over 200. C. Custer at ChinaGeeks has written about...

Michael Sandel in China

Last month, renowned Harvard professor Michael Sandel delivered a lecture on justice and morality at Tsinghua University in China. He also talked about how his theories relate to contemporary China...

China: The Machinery of Stability Preservation

The Dui Hua Foundation's Human Rights Journal has translated a detailed report by the liberal Caijing magazine about the organizational structure behind China's efforts to maintain social stability as it...

China: Writing Imaginary Book Reviews

In 2010, a collection of reviews for non-existent books, written by Chinese author Bimuyu, was published. This month Bimuyu shared with readers his thinking behind these reviews.

China: Death of Bin Laden and the Clash of Civilizations

In the early 1990s, political scientist Samuel Huntington put forward the clash of civilizations theory that the fundamental source of conflict in the post-Cold War world will be cultural. Two...

China: Yang Hengjun's thoughts on his kidnapping

China Media Project has posted an English version of the blog of Sino-Australian novelist Yang Hengjun, who shared his thoughts and feelings on his disappearance from Guangzhou airport last month,...

China: Ran Yunfei’s Blogging for Political Change

A well-known and respected blogger, Ran Yunfei consistently writes about social justice and democratic reforms in China. He has been charged with 'inciting subversion of state power' on March 28...

China: Reactions to Global Times’ Lashing Out at Ai Weiwei

China's official newspaper Global Times has issued a harsh editorial condemning missing artist Ai Weiwei as a maverick of Chinese society, sparking reactions from Chinese netizens.

China: Ai Weiwei Detained, Initial Twitter Reactions

China’s best known artist and dissident, Ai Weiwei, was detained in Beijing as he tried to board a flight to Hong Kong on Sunday 3 April, 2011. Ai is the...

China: Disappearance of human rights activists

As the world’s attention is focusing on the Middle East and North Africa, crackdown on human rights activists in China is continuing unabated following online calls for ‘Jasmine Revolution’. C....

China: No real friends abroad?

In recent years, China has spent a lot to cultivate alliances with illiberal regimes around the world. While it is portrayed as a battle against Western "universal values", the real...

China: Open letter from Jasmine organizers

Human Rights in China translated an open letter, first posted on Boxun's temporary website, from the organizers of the Chinese Jasmine rallies held on 20 February 2011. The letter calls...

China and Mongolia: Goliath and David?

At East Asia Forum, Justin Li discussed the Sinophobia in Mongolia caused by high dependence on China for trade and investment. In another article on the Forum, Julian Dierkes questioned...

China: The coming of age of Political Confucianism?

The unveiling of the Confucius statue in Tiananmen Square last month has renewed the debate about Political Confucianism as the state ideology of China.

China: Mapping labor unrest

Cornell PhD student Manfred Elfstrom has started a website to map instances of labor unrest across China on the Ushahidi platform.

China: Social media for social change

It would be innocent to think that social media can lead to revolutionary changes in China, but we should not underestimate the potential of micro-power for social progress, China media...

Hong Kong: Remembering Szeto Wah

Hong Kong democracy icon Szeto Wah passed away on 2 January 2011, aged 79. Eddie Cheng, author of the book Standoff at Tiananmen, reviews the life of the democracy advocate....

China: Qian Yunhui’s death and the role of citizen investigation

The Qian Yunhui case sparks further debate about the role of citizen investigation teams in China.

China: Conditions in Tibet Since 2008

In an interview with Asia Pacific Memo, Dr. Robert J. Barnett talks about what life has been like in Tibet since 2008 and the obstacles to talks between exiled Tibetans...

China: Educated youth face a tough future

China Media Project translates an article by Yu Jianrong about educated youth in China, which can be divided into two groups. The first one are privileged by their access to...

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