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Amira Al Hussaini · May, 2008

Former news editor of an English language daily in Bahrain. Journalist. Columnist. Blogger. Educated and raised in Bahrain. Interests include writing, the arts and human rights.

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Latest posts by Amira Al Hussaini from May, 2008

Lebanon: Palestinian Children's Exhibition

Lebanese Rania Masri writes about a photography exhibition by the children Palestinian refugees, living in camps in Lebanon. “500 cameras were placed in the hands of 500 children in all...

Syria: Golan Cherries for Export

From Syria, Sasa writes: “Syrian farmers living under Israeli occupation have asked Israel to allow them to sell their cherries inside Syria. Living under occupation means they can not travel...

Bahrain: Car Respect

From Bahrain, Flymenian writes about superficial people judge people based on the value of cars they drive.

Egypt: On the Hijab

Egyptian Arima shares her ideas on a controversial post on the Islamic headscarf worn by women.

Egypt: Styill Building Pyramids

Tom Gara says the Egyptians are continuing to build pyramids – in this sarcastic post.

Egypt: Strike Number Three

Egypt is gearing up for its third strike in a row on June 5, writes Zeinobia. “People in Egypt are extremely angry from the Government's latest economic decisions to escalate...

Bahrain: Exams and Luck

Bahraini Silverooo is gearing up for an exam – and asks readers to wish her luck.

Egypt: On Caramel

Egyptian Arima has just watched Caramel – and has good things to say about the movie about five friends in Beirut, Lebanon.

Egypt: Torture Acceptable

Egyptian blogger Mostafa is surprised that some of his friends find torture as an acceptable form of extracting confessions from people being interrogated – after an experiment he conducted on...

Bahrain: A Tourist at Home

Bahraini Khalid shares his experience as a tourist in his own country – when college friends from abroad came for a one-day visit.

Bahrain: The Ideal Woman

From Bahrain, The Girl with No Face says she will go through a surgical procedure to help her reduce weight and adds: “I’ve given up that one day someone will...

Bahrain: Sectarian and Xenophobic

“It seems that Bahrain (as in government and MPs) are just not content with being called sectarian but are now adding a new adjective to their resume- xenophobic,” writes Bahraini...

Bahrain: Shia Shrines

Bint Battuta in Bahrain visits two Shia shrines and posts pictures here.

Bahrain: Hating Facebook

Bahraini blogger Mahmood Al Yousif says he hates Facebook – or more specifically its applications.

Algeria: Third World Countries

Algerian Nouri shares his thoughts on Third World countries in this post.

Saudi Arabia: Thoughts on The Prisoner

From Saudi Arabia, Hayfa [Ar] read The Prisoner by Moroccan writer Malika Oufkir and shares her thoughts about it here.

Syria: Annoying Crows

From Syria, Allosh [Ar] is annoyed with crows, which have decided to make a home in the tree outside his window.

Lebanon: An Eyewitness Report

Lebanese journalist and blogger Lelia Mezher was one of several Lebanese bloggers who worked round the clock to keep the world informed about the crisis which rocked her country when...

Lebanon: Clashes and Babies

Diana, who lives in Dubai and is expecting a baby in two months, is glad to have returned to Lebanon. She explains: “I cried my eyes out when I saw...

Jordan: Shy of Bras

An exhibition with a difference is being held in Jordan – that of bras – and the media is shy from covering it, writes Ahmed Humeid.

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