Alexey Sidorenko · February, 2012

Born in Moscow. Graduated from the Moscow State University and defended Ph.D thesis there. Currently finishing MA thesis in the Warsaw University, Poland. Worked in Carnegie Moscow Center from 2005 till 2008 in the “Society and Regions” programm. More events at my blog

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Latest posts by Alexey Sidorenko from February, 2012

Russia: DDoS Attack Puts Down Several Political Websites As Cyberwar Escalates

RuNet Echo  9 February 2012

On February 9, 2012, following the widely-discussed leaks of pro-Kremlin mailboxes, LiveJournal, where the leaks were published, became temporarily unavailable, Lenta.ru reported [ru]. Russian representative of Anonymous group @OP_Russia, suggested [ru] that it was a DDoS attack to hide the evidence of massive wrongdoings (including corruption, thievery, political provocations, and cybercrime) [ru] by...

Russia: New .Ru Domain Registration Rules Allow Easy Domain Seizure

RuNet Echo  8 February 2012

Andrey Rylkov Foundation writes about the first case of enforcement of the domain seizure rules in the “.ru” and “.рф” domain zones. The rules [ru] (Article 5, point 5.5) , updated on November 11, 2011 allow any law enforcement agency (like police, Federal Security Service, Prosecutor's office or Federal Drug Control Services (FDCS)) to request...

Russia: The Anonymous Hacks and Publishes E-mails of Pro-Kremlin Youth Group

RuNet Echo  8 February 2012

Read The Guardian's take on the so-called “Potupchik-gate,” a series of scandals surfaced as a result of hacking and publishing of private inbox of Kristina Potupchik [ru], press-secretary of Nashi, notorious pro-Kremlin youth group. All hacks were published by twitter-user @OP_Russia who uses Anonymous symbolics. Representatives of Anonymous, previously never seen involved...

Russia: Day of Protests Divides Citizens

RuNet Echo  5 February 2012

Despite temperatures of -20 degrees, thousands of Russians went out to the streets to participate in election manifestations. Some, organised online, were protesting against the elections and possible re-election of prime minister Vladimir Putin. Others, partly organised by pressure and bribes as well as fear of possible revolutions manifested that Putin should stay.

Russia: Prices of Popular Bloggers’ Posts Leaked

RuNet Echo  2 February 2012

Anonymous hackers had allegedly hacked an inbox of pro-Kremlin activist Kristina Potupchik and publicised [ru] a ‘price-list’ of posts of the most popular Russian bloggers. Government-sponsored Nashi were caught several times on organizing paid campaigns aimed to influence blogosphere's opinion. The prices vary from 130 to 1000 US dollars per post.

Russia: “For Fair Elections” Protest Coordination Portal Launches

RuNet Echo  1 February 2012

RosMiting.ru (Russian meeting), a community portal of protest actions, had launched. The portal accumulates information about protest events in various cities of Russia. It was created by the same team which started other interactive portals such as RosYama, RosPil, RosAgit, and RosVybory, politically-engaged crowdsourced communities and interactive portals developed in...

Russia: Ulyanovsk Blogger Wins Libel Case Against Governor

RuNet Echo  1 February 2012

Ulyanovsk-based blogger Oleg Sofyin (LJ-user lis73) won a court case against Ulyanovsk governor Svetlana Openysheva, lenta.ru reports [ru]. Openysheva tried to sue Sofyin for publishing a post where he described a phone call during which someone named Azat threatened him if he will continue to post critical articles about Openysheva. Despite winning the...

Russia: Vladimir Putin Ignites a Pre-Election Debate on Nationalism

RuNet Echo  1 February 2012

Following Vladimir Putin's article [ru] on ‘nationality question,’ Dmitry Rogozin, vice-premier and former leader of semi-nationalist party “Rodina,” had published [ru] an op-ed in which he calls nationalists who participate in post-election protests to join pro-government ranks. Oleg Kashin, Kommersant reporter, analyses [ru] it as a scary perspective for non-Russians who considered Putin a some sort...

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