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Alexander Sodiqov · June, 2012

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Latest posts by Alexander Sodiqov from June, 2012

Tajikistan: Is There ‘National Unity’ in the Country?

As Tajikistan marks an anniversary of peace accords that put an end to the civil war and brought about ‘national unity’ in the country, blogger Ilhom writes [tj] about his recollections of the war. Another blogger, Jovid Muqim, suggests [tj] that there can be no ‘national unity’ in the country where...

Tajikistan: The Role of Intellectuals in Running a Country

Should poets have a bigger say in how the countries they live in are run? Adash Istad writes [tj] that Tajik intellectuals have stayed out of government affairs too long. The blogger argues that it is time for intellectuals to understand that they have a particular ‘mission’ which consists of educating...

Afghanistan: More Girls Poisoned for Attending School

Following our recent report on a string of attacks targeting female students at schools in Afghanistan, there have been three new attacks over the last three days in the country's north. About 300 girls have been poisoned. Commenting on the latest attack, Brazilian journalist Maria Stella Soares writes on Twitter: “Ignorance...

Tajikistan: The Lost Meaning of National Reconciliation Day

June 27 is celebrated in Tajikistan as National Reconciliation Day commemorating the signing of the peace accords that put an end to the civil war in the country. Journalist Olga Tutubalina writes [ru] in her blog that the holiday has lost its meaning: “Our ruling clique has not reconciled with its former adversaries,...

Afghanistan: Women Leaders on Twitter

Ahmad Shuja, an Afghan blogger and political commentator based in US, has put together a list of 15 must-follow Twitter feeds by Afghan women leaders. Shuja explains: “I thought I’d try and share with the world the wonderful work Afghan women do everyday, often in extremely difficult and dangerous circumstances”.

Tajikistan: Language and Nation-Building

Blogger Adash Istad ponders [tj] the importance of a common vernacular language in the process of nation-building in Tajikistan. The author writes: “We have a national spoken language [which all groups in the country should be able to speak]. Those who do not want to understand this simple truth will...

Uzbekistan: ‘Lavish’ Weddings Banned in Tashkent

Following in the footsteps of Tajikistan, the Mayor's Office in the Uzbek capital Tashkent has banned [uz] ‘lavish’ weddings in the city. However, as Marat Satpaev writes on NewEurasia.net, the ban will mostly extend to poor families because people with money and power will be able to defy the restrictions.

Living with HIV in Kazakhstan

On the Kazakh photo blog Vox Populi, Gulnar Bazhkenova presents a powerful photo essay [ru] with the stories of people living with HIV/AIDS in Kazakhstan. These individuals have decided to disclose their HIV status and show their faces in order to “send a message that they are normal people and that...

Tajikistan: Sharia Replaces Secular Law

Blogger Kayumars Ato writes [ru] that Sharia, or Islamic law, is gradually replacing secular law in Tajikistan. Excessive red tape and corruption in the country's courts increasingly lead Tajiks to consult Islamic leaders for guidance in disputes relating to marriage, divorce, and inheritance.

Kazakhstan: Pay to Get Your Artwork Noticed

Anara gives [ru] an insider's view on how a young artist can get ‘noticed’ by the art establishment in Kazakhstan. Apparently, talent is not a substitute for lots of money that emerging artists need to pay for presenting their artwork at galleries and having specialized journals write favorable reviews of...

Kazakhstan Joins the Central Asian Ban on ‘The Dictator’

Following in the footsteps of Tajikistan and Turkmenistan, Kazakhstan has stopped [ru] showing The Dictator, Sacha Baron Cohen‘s latest spoof blockbuster. Baron Cohen's 2006 comedy film, Borat, which ridicules Kazakhstan has also been banned in the country. Responding to the news, @registan_net tweets: ‘Come on, Kazakhstan, people are going to start thinking you...

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