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Insects Swarm Japanese Social Media: Beautiful, Breathtaking, and Bamboo

Photo: Pixabay. Edited by Kevin Rothrock.

Photo: Pixabay. Edited by Kevin Rothrock.

A Japanese artist is using traditional artisanal craft techniques to create compelling bamboo insects that have developed a devoted following online.

Uses chikusei (bamboo crafting), Noriyuki Saitoh uploads photos of his insects to social media and to his website. He also tweets images of his intricately detailed bamboo insects, which are typically shared and reposted hundreds of times.

For a good selection of Saitoh's bamboo insect creations, see his most recent Twitter New Year's card, addressed to his followers, with photos of bamboo paper wasps, a mantis, a beetle, damselflies and a cicada:

Thanks for all of your follows, RTs, and likes over the past year. You all inspire me to do everything I do.

Detailed photo essays of Saitoh's creations can also be found on his Facebook page.

Saitoh is careful to point out that his creations are intended to be art, rather than accurate models of insects:



My insect creations are not intended to be realistic. Since I'm not using specimens or replicas. I'm not aiming for accuracy in proportion, but instead I'm focused on the detail, impression of, and feel of the bamboo insect.

While the bamboo insects may not be entirely accurate, the skillful attention to detail elevates the bamboo creations:

( ・ㅂ・)و ̑̑

The paper wasps [Polistes jokahamae] are complete!! I have uploaded to my website:


I have uploaded photos of my completed orchid mantis [Hymenopus coronatus] to my website:


Photos of the completed golden flangetail dragonfly [Sinictinogomphus clavatus]:

Stag beetle [Cyclommatus elaphus]

Saitoh's account on Twitter and his website also explain the step-by-step process he uses to make and assemble his bamboo insects.


Dragonfly wings are completed.

On YouTube, Saitoh has also shared a video showing how he made his dragonfly wings:

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