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April, 2016

Stories from April, 2016

30 April 2016

As UN Decides Future of Western Sahara Peacekeeping Mission, Sahrawis Press for Human Rights

While international diplomats met this week to determine the future of the UN’s peacekeeping mission in Western Sahara, demonstrators throughout the occupied territory are calling for self-determination and human rights.

Iraqi Protestors Storm Parliament; State of Emergency Declared

Hundreds of Iraqi protestors stormed the Parliament building, in Baghdad's fortified Green Zone, in protest against a deadlock in approving a new government today. A state of emergency was declared.

Portraits From Nepal: Survivors Struggle to Rebuild a Year After the Deadly Quake

The devastating quake hit on April 25, 2015, killing almost 9,000 people and leaving many thousands homeless.

29 April 2016

Meet the Anti-Discrimination Non-Profit Behind the Jamaican Version of a ‘Privilege Walk’

"We believe that everyone, no matter who they are, is deserving of respect. [...] This is necessary in changing the course [of] human rights development in Jamaica."

Tackling Child Marriage in India, One Wedding Tent at a Time

"How can we call ourselves progressive where such evil custom of society thrives."

South Sudan Is a Dangerous Place to Work as a Journalist

"South Sudan: 7 journalists killed in 2015. No killers brought to justice. No explanation from government."

Fighting Fear and Hopelessness From House Arrest in Macedonia

A 19-year-old law student placed under house arrest in Macedonia explains why thousands of protesters like him are fed up with the nation's leaders.

South Africa Bans Several Sports Bodies From Hosting Global Events Over Lack of Diversity

"The ban on hosting global sporting events is another nail in the coffin for economic development and job creation."

28 April 2016

Five Cameroonian Data Journalists Take Stock of Paul Biya's 33 Governments

A data journalism project sheds light on all 33 different governing bodies during the Paul Biya administration in Cameroon.

Five Years Ago, a Tsunami Devastated Japan. Now a Filmmaker Looks Back.

The Canadian filmmaker Estelle Hebert has produced a one-hour documentary about one village's struggle to revive after a massive tsunami devastated much of Japan on March 11, 2011.

The Fight to Control the Narrative in Burundi's Crisis

Government critics are rejected as plotting or linked to insurgency, while government supporters and security services employees become collectively associated with authorities' repressive tactics.

27 April 2016

Anatomy of a Macedonian ‘Colorful Revolution’

"Why do I protest, and what is the Colorful Revolution? This is a struggle against the authoritarian and corrupt regime, personified by ex-Prime Minister Nikola Gruevski."

Syria: What Forgiveness Doesn't Mean

The Bridge

'I wish the soul of the revolution was enough for me to be able to pardon them all, if only in the “court in my head”.

Eight Challenges Indian-Language Wikipedias Need to Overcome

The Bridge

While native-language Wikipedias are becoming game-changers in other parts of the world, India, in spite of having numerous languages, lags way behind. Here are a few of the reasons why.

Buenos Aires’ Not So Little Italy

Italian Argentines show their cultural legacy in different ways. In Buenos Aires' annual "Piccola Italia" festival, "Al Dente!" celebrates the country's Day of Italianness.

Macedonian Protesters ‘Congratulate’ Pardoned Ex-Interior Minister at Her PhD Graduation

Protesters crashed a public ceremony where Gordana Jankuloska was formally receiving her doctoral degree and unfurled a banner reading "Congratulations on your pardon!"

Chinese Big Brother Is Watching You, Even in Australia

"We are concerned that Mr Wu is becoming a victim of the Chinese government’s increasingly intrusive attempts to curb voices of dissent among overseas Chinese."

Your Skin Is Gonna Hate Japan's Yellow Sand

Every year Japan marks the start of spring with the arrival of 'Yellow Sand' from the Asian mainland. The sand hampers visibility and can cause illness and skin problems.

Here's a Map That Shows You What the Japanese Really Think of Europe

According to Japanese stereotypes, which country in Europe has the most luxurious prisons? And which country in Europe is full of stupid people? And why can't Latvians eat potatoes?

European Union Slams China Over Missing Hong Kong Booksellers

"The case involves a serious violation of human rights and fundamental freedoms and raises grave concerns about the rule of law under the ‘one country, two systems’ principle..."

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