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A Brief Twitter Guide to Uganda's Elections This Month

Uganda's main presidential candidates. Public Domain and Creative Commons photos from U.S. State Department, Flicker user Dispatch Uganda and U.S. Department of Defense.

A screenshot of Uganda's main presidential candidates. Public Domain and Creative Commons photos from U.S. State Department, Flicker user Dispatch Uganda and U.S. Department of Defense.

 

Uganda goes to the polls on Thursday, February 18, to elect a president amid fears of election-related violence. President Yoweri Museveni, who has been in power since 1986, is seeking a fifth term. (There are no presidential term limits in Uganda.) The main opposition candidates are Dr. Kizza Besigye from the Forum for Democratic Change, who is running against Museveni for the fourth time, and Amama Mbabazi, an independent candidate from the GoForward advocacy group. Both men are Museveni's previous allies, before he dismissed them (reportedly for harboring presidential ambitions).

Other candidates are Abed Bwanika, Benon Biraaro, Venansius Baryamureeba, Joseph Mabirizi, and the only woman running for president, Maureen Kyalya.

Ugandans will also vote in parliamentary and local elections on the same day.

Below is a brief Twitter guide for updates, news, analysis, and reports related to Uganda's elections this month:

Hashtags

Key hashtags to follow are #UgandaDecides#IChoosePeaceUG, #GoForward2016, #WesigeBesigye, #UGDebate16, #SteadyProgress, and #IPledgePeaceUG, which was launched by the Young African Leadership Initiative Network (YALI) with support from the U.S. Embassy in Uganda.

Twitter users

News media

Presidential candidates

Uganda's Electoral Commission

  • ECUganda, official Twitter account of the electoral commission
  • Jotham Taremwa, Spokesperson of Uganda Electoral Commission

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