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Calls to Sack New Zealand House Speaker Over Sexual Assaults Fiasco

New Zealand Speaker David Carter ejects female MPs

New Zealand Speaker David Carter ejects female members of Parliament. Screenshot from TV NZ.

The speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives, David Carter, sparked outcry after he ejected several female members of Parliament who had been trying to disclose that they were victims of sexual assaults.

The clash followed Prime Minster John Key's attack on opposition members for “backing the rapists” over the controversial detention of New Zealand citizens in Australia. They are waiting on appeals against their deportation, which applies to those who have had gaol terms of more than one year.

The prime minister insisted that majority of New Zealand citizens detained in Australia were convicted for murder and rape.

Some female members of Parliament felt offended by the remarks of the prime minister and demanded an apology from the leader. Some came forward to testify that they were victims of sexual violence but they were stopped by the speaker.

Paul Williams expressed feelings that were being shared widely under the Twitter hashtag #SacktheSpeaker:

Many have been concerned that the issue of sexual assault has been diminished by its use for political point scoring:

Eleni Grace agreed, sharing a Greens Party video of the attempted disclosures in parliament.

Speaker David Carter has had his supporters with some questioning the integrity of those expressing outrage over the incident:

Allan Buxton did not pull any punches in his criticism:

To judge by the handle, ArrestJK is no friend of Prime Minister Key and would like to see another form of democracy applied:

Matthew Codd suggested an even more creative solution:

Anyway, it is a fair bet that the New Zealand speaker does not top the national Twitter trends very often:

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