See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

New Black Hand Street Art Surfaces in Tehran in Response to ‪#‎LetWomenGoToStadium‬

A new from Iranian street artist has emerged depicting a male sports fan brandishing dishwashing liquid like a sports trophy. Image take from the artists Facebook page.

A new work from Iranian street artist has emerged depicting a male sports fan brandishing dishwashing liquid like a sports trophy. Image take from the artists Facebook page.

A new image by Iranian street artist Black Hand has surfaced tody on the artist's associated Facebook page. The image is in response to the online and offline #LetWomenGoToStadium protests advocating for the presence of women during the Volleyball World League men’s games in Tehran between Iran and the United States. Women, including female journalists, are banned from attending male sports matches in stadiums.

Iranian street artist Black Hand has long been a fixture on social media, offering timely commentary on events effecting Iran. Black Hand is an anonymous artist or group of artists dubbed the “Iranian Banksy” by some media outlets. Graffiti is illegal in Iran, though authorities allow street art that supports the Islamic Republic. The artist posts photos of the art on an associated Facebook page before they are removed by authorities.

This particular image shows a man wearing the national Iranian football team's jersey, thrusting a bottle of dishwashing liquid reminiscent of players holding up the World Cup trophy. A similar Black Hand image initially appeared in July 2014 with a woman posing in with dishwashing liquid around the time that the team was competing in the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil.

The artist explained on the comment section of his photo's post that the image appears in the same location as the July 2014 one, across from Tehran's Park Saee.

The June 19 volleyball match caused much excitement after the government announced some women would be allowed entry, despite the long-standing ban on women attending male sporting events. Two hundred of the 12,000 seats in the stadium were reserved for women. Security officials, however, denied the entrance of these ticket holders a few hours before the start of the game.

1 comment

Join the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices
* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site