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Humorous #BeingGhanaianHasTaughtMe Trends in Ghana

ICT in Ghana can mean Information Computer Technology. Photo released under Creative Commons by Wikipedia user SandisterTei.

ICT in Ghana can mean Information Computer Technology. Photo released under Creative Commons by Wikipedia user SandisterTei.

#BeingGhanaianHasTaughtMe is a trending Twitter hashtag for humorous descriptions of lessons learned from being a Ghanaian. Here are our selection of the best #BeingGhanaianHasTaughtMe tweets:

Ghana, like many African countries experiences power cuts:

What is tea in Ghana?:

How do Ghanaians recycle ice cream containers:

One photo that every barber must own:

The game of Truth or Dare the Ghanaian way:

Is every Chinese a ‘Bruce Lee'?:

Beware of Ghanaian traffic rules:

What does ICT mean?:

You thought H2O means water?:

When you wish your father a Happy Father's Day:

How do you go to a party if you do not own a car [Troskie is a public minibus]?:

Funny names from Ewe, a Ghanaian ethnic group:

Being Ghanaian means knowing how to bargain:

How are Ghanaian women expected to meet their future husbands?:

Parents are always right:

OMO is not only the most popular detergent brand in Ghana:

What about plates and glasses for decoration?:

Read more #BeingGhanaianHasTaughtMe tweets here.

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