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What Does Hacking Education Mean?

Pedro Muller reflects on the lapse of the school system, an institution he says meant for a different historical context. In this regard, he notes the importance of two similar, but at the same time different, concepts: “to study” and “to be educated”:

El educar se va más allá de memorizarse un par de nombres y olvidarlos al siguiente día, consiste en aprender tener la curiosidad de preguntarse qué hay detrás de lo obvio, es adquirir habilidades, ejercitar tu pensamiento lateral un pensamiento divergente o como muchos dicen “fuera de la caja”, educarse también es crear y hacer convertir nada en algo, innovar.

Nosotros aprendemos mejor en grupo es parte de nuestra naturaleza, discutir, pensar y reflexionar sobre un tema en específico sacar conclusiones, como muchos dicen la mejor manera de educarse es aprender.

To be educated goes beyond memorizing a couple of names and forgetting them the next day. It is about having an inquisitive mind and wondering about what hides behind the obvious, it is to acquire skills, to exercise your lateral thinking, a divergent thinking that many call “thinking outside of the box”. To be educated is also about learning to be creative and innovative.

We learn better in groups; it is part of our nature to discuss, think and reflect on a specific topic and draw conclusions. It is said that the best way to became educated is to learn.

Muller invites readers to watch the following English-language video, wherein Logan LaPlante talks about the concept of ​​”hacking education” or “hackschooling”, which refers to the process of learning as a group experience, based on trial and error and, above all, the importance of creativity.

Continue reading Muller's post here, or follow him on Twitter.

This post was part of the 46th #LunesDeBlogsGV (Monday of blogs on GV) on March 23, 2015.

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