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Photos Show Homes, Schools, Bridges, Airports, and Stadiums Destroyed in Yemen War

The biggest airstrike reported shook the capital Sanaa on April 20. On Twitter, @ammar82 shares this photograph from the blast site, in a residential area. The bombing has left dozens of people dead and hundreds injured

The biggest airstrike reported shook the capital Sanaa on April 20. On Twitter, @ammar82 shares this photograph from the blast site, in a residential area. The bombing has left dozens of people dead and hundreds injured

Arab coalition forces have been pounding Yemen with airstrikes for a month. Their assault has not been limited to military sites or their main target, tribal fighters the Houthis, who took control of Yemen's capital Sana'a from President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi in January.

There is also massive destruction in the beautiful southern port city Aden, where the Houthis have been pushing their response, along with forces loyal to Yemen's former president, Ali Abdullah Saleh.

Saleh stepped down after three decades as president following popular protests in 2011, and handed power to Hadi through a deal brokered by the GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council), led by Saudi Arabia. The same countries are currently bombing Yemen. Saleh still controls most of Yemen's army units and wields influence in the world's poorest Arab country. 

Also read: “We Walk Around Death,” Tweets a Yemeni Blogger about the Horrors of War

A published report by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) on April 17 summarises the vast destruction:

Civilian infrastructure has been destroyed, damaged and disrupted as a result of the fighting, including at least five hospitals (Sana’a, Al Dhale’e and Aden), 15 schools and educational institutions (Aden, Al Dhale’e, and Sana’a), the three main national airports (Sana’a, Aden and Hudaydah), and at least two bridges, two factories and four mosques in Al Dhale’e. Reports have also been received of damage to local markets, power stations, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) infrastructure in Aden, Hajjah and Sa’ada. Civilians’ private homes are being directly affected by airstrikes and armed clashes, particularly in the south.

Saudi Arabia, leading the military operation in the war in Yemen, announced on April 21 that it was ending Operation Decisive storm after reaching its aims and is starting Operation Restoring Hope, which aims at finding a political solution in the country it had been bombing for the last four weeks. A total of 944 people have been killed and 3,487 injured in fighting in Yemen since Saudi Arabia launched its military campaign on March 26.

Also read: Electricity, Food and Fuel Shortages Increase Suffering of Yemenis as Saudi-Coalition Bombs Continue to Fall

The majority of these powerful photographs and videos show the vast devastation and destruction caused by the US-backed Saudi Arabia-led Operation Decisive Storm airstrikes, while some are by the Houthi/Saleh tank bombardments.

Yemen Updates and other Twitter users shared news and images of the massive destruction, across Yemeni cities, caused by the war.

The biggest airstrike reported shook the capital Sanaa on April 20. It was targeting a weapon depot in Faj Attan, which was in a residential area and the massive explosion caused dozens of deaths and hundreds of injuries along with the destruction of properties.

Operation Decisive Storm and its airstrikes, the ongoing fighting by Houthi and Saleh militia in Taiz, Mareb and the southern governorates has caused death and destruction across Yemen as many innocent civilians are caught in the crossfire.

Also read: GV Tracking the Destruction of Infrastructure in Yemen

Some wondered what Operation Restore Hope would bring?

Ruba Aleryani, resiliently tweeted:

1 comment

  • […] An April 17 UN report says: Civilian infrastructure has been destroyed, damaged and disrupted as a result of the fighting, including at least five hospitals (Sana’a, Al Dhale’e and Aden), 15 schools and educational institutions (Aden, Al Dhale’e, and Sana’a), the three main national airports (Sana’a, Aden and Hudaydah), and at least two bridges, two factories and four mosques in Al Dhale’e. Reports have also been received of damage to local markets, power stations, and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) infrastructure in Aden, Hajjah and Sa’ada. Civilians’ private homes are being directly affected by airstrikes and armed clashes, particularly in the south. […]

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