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Ayotzinapa: Duality of Internet Denunciation

Vero Flores Desentis, blogging for Mujeres Construyendo (Women Building), reflects on Internet users’ behavior regarding the disappearance of 43 students in Ayotzinapa and rubs salt in the wound of those of us who use cyberspace for worthy causes, and calls us to an in-depth examination of our conscience: are denouncing and indignation on the Internet enough to make a change or do they just represent a simple catharsis? Thus, the author points out the duality of Internet denunciation regarding the events in Ayotzinapa:

Creo que es un tema que duele a la sociedad, y duele mucho. Lo que me sorprende es la dualidad de la denuncia social. Por un lado, cada vez tenemos más acceso a plataformas que nos sirven para denunciar o para establecer públicamente algún posicionamiento frente a un tema, y cada vez somos más las personas que las utilizamos. Y estas denuncias son una herramienta muy poderosa de denuncia social sin duda. Pero por otro, la denuncia ahí se queda, no hay un eco de ejecución que realmente ayude a disminuir los casos que lamentablemente siguen sucediendo.

I think this is something that hurts society. What amazes me is the duality of social denunciation. On one hand, each time we have more access to platforms that allow us to denounce or set publicly some position about a given topic, and each time more people use them. And these condemnations are a very powerful tool for social denunciation. Burt on the other hand, the denounce just stays there, there is no echo of carrying out that really helps reducing the cases that, unfortunately, keep coming.

Fotografía extraída del blog Mujeres Construyendo, utilizada con autorización

Image from Mujeres Construyendo blog, used with permission.

Vero adds that just as in other disturbing cases, social networks channel our outrage about Ayotzinapa, although making it public doesn't change the situation. To change something, we must act outside the cybernetic world, changing our actions.

You can follow Vero Flores Desentis on Twitter.

This post was part of the 28th #LunesDeBlogsGV (Monday of blogs on GV) on November 10, 2014.

2 comments

  • […] Ayotzinapa: Duality of Web Denunciation Vero Flores Desentis, running a blog for Mujeres Construyendo (Ladies Constructing), displays on Web customers' conduct relating to the disappearance of forty three college students in Ayotzinapa and rubs salt into the wound to these of us who use the our on-line world for worthy causes … Learn extra on Global Voices Online […]

  • […] Añez · Translated by Gabriela García Calderón · View original post [es] · comments (1) Donate · Share this: twitter facebook reddit […]

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