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Experiences After Working at a Youth Hostel

Queralt Castillo Cerezuela describes herself as a ‘wanderer’, natural born nomadic and, of course, journalist. That's possibly the origin of her blog's name, Errabundus. On one of her posts, this globetrotter tries to report about her time working at a youth hostel in the Southern Alps and lists six things that would make life easier to those people who work at hostels:

- Cuando haya un cartelito en el que pone: “por favor, lava tus platos”, no es una opción: debes lavarlos sí o sí.
– El fregadero de tu casa no hace desaparecer la comida, ¿verdad? El de los hostels tampoco
– Solo tú eres responsable de tus objetos.
– ¿Tanto te cuesta abrir las ventanas antes de salir de la habitación?
– Los pelos que dejas en las duchas no desaparecen por arte de magia
– Sabes que debes retirar las sábanas cuando te vayas, ¿verdad?

- When you find a sign saying: “please, wash your dishes”, it's not an option, you must wash them no matter what.
– The sink at home doesn't make food disappear, right? Neither does at hostels.
– You are the only responsible of your belongings.
– Is it that difficult to open the windows before leaving the room?
– The hair you leave in the shower won't disappear as if by magic.
– You do know you have to remove the sheets when you leave, right?

It may seem no big deal, but there are thousands of backpakers around the world and reading about these experiences might help them behave differently next time they decide to stay at a place like the one where Castillo Cerezuela worked at, for the sake of her traveler spirit.

Please, follow the journey of this traveler on her Facebook page or on her account on Twitter.

This post was part of the twenty-eighth #LunesDeBlogsGV (Monday of blogs on GV) on November 10, 2014.

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