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Rural Tourism at Itapeby Country House in Argentina

Wenceslao Bottaro, blogging on Blucansendel, presents us with a business venture in sustainable rural tourism: Itapeby Country House, located in the Argentinian province of Entre Ríos, close to Gualeguaychú.

Itapeby is home to Poppy and Rodolfo, who grow crops and raise cows, pigs, poultry and sheep, offering visitors the fruits of their labor. If visitors want to, they can participate in the daily activities of rural life, such as milling corn, milking or shearing. They can also take a ride on a horse-drawn carriage, go horseback riding, do some trekking or go birdwatching.

Fotografía extraída del blog Blucansendel, utilizada con autorización

Photo from the blog Blucansendel, used with permission.

Visitors can also enjoy country home-made specialties, such as fritters, scones, breads, candy, all made by Poppy. Everything Itapeby produces is consumed: animals, dairy, vegetables, hams, sausages, salamis, etc. Itapeby combines rural lifestyle with comfort for the guests:

La Posada es el área destinada a los visitantes. Es una construcción cubierta por un espeso techo de paja y chapas debajo del cual hay cinco habitaciones, enormes, confortables y de lujosa rusticidad. La Posada está rodeada por un deck/galería donde cuelgan hamacas paraguayas dispuestas de manera estratégica para disfrutar de las salidas y las puestas del sol. Todo el conjunto está envuelto por el aroma de las flores que rodean la casa.

The Inn is the area for visitors. It's a building covered by a thick straw roof. Inside, there are five bedrooms, huge, comfortable and with luxury rusticity. The Inn is surrounded by a deck where Paraguayan hammocks hang, strategically arranged to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. The whole area is blanketed in the aroma of flowers that surround the house.

You can follow Wenceslao Bottaro on Twitter.

This post was part of the 28th #LunesDeBlogsGV (Monday of blogs on GV) on November 10, 2014.

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