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The October Sky Above Colombia Is Full of Migrating Birds

Bird migration en Wikipedia bajo licencia CC by 2.0

Migratory birds from Wikipedia, CC by 2.0.

During October, Colombian skies witness an impressive sight as migratory birds such as sparrowhawks and falcons pass overhead in search of warmer weather. Cyberspace isn't exempt from all these events.

In 2013, for instance, YouTube user SebasNavarroColumbus posted a video that captured the migration of birds over the sky of Medellín.

In 2014, users such as Juan Felipe Duque (@JuanFelipeDuque) reported seeing a flock of birds land on the campus of his university:

Migratory birds, I saw them today. I don't know their name, first time I've seen them on university campus.

Salomón Romero (@SalomonRomero) regretted having missed the chance to take photos of the falcons:

In Santa Fe de Antioquia, I saw a couple of falcons resting on the road. Unfortunately, I didn't take a picture.

On the web portal Dodo.com, an image was shared of a species popularly known as fork-tailed flycatcher:

A Tyrannus savana and a sum-up of yesterday's journey.

Not all birds migrate, but those that do often move along a north-south trajectory between breeding and wintering grounds, according to Wikipedia. Some species migrate every year in October from the United States, escaping winter in favor of tropical climates in countries such as Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and even Argentina.

In Colombia, ICESI University has set up Wiki Birds of Colombia, where users can find information on a great variety of species: scientific name, map, distribution and dates where the birds can be seen in Colombia. In the past, Global Voices posted an article about Kuntur, an app for birdwatching, which could be very useful for these natural events.

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