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Quinchao Mapuche Community and the Covunco Stream Pool

zapala-arroyo-covunco

Image by Wenceslao Bottaro, used with permission.

Argentinian journalist and travel blogger Wenceslao Bottaro describes [es] the experiences during his trip to Neuquén Province, department of Zapala, specifically the Qinchao township [es], home of the namesake Mapuche community. He notes that the tourist attraction in Zapala appear in any guide nor travel agency. That's why he traces the direction and show photos of what would be the journey on the Route 40 (Argentina):

El pozón del Covunco se encuentra a unos 25 km de Zapala y está ubicado en un tramo del arroyo que atraviesa el territorio de la comunidad mapuche Quinchao.
[…]
Sentado en la cima de una extraña roca horadada por el tiempo, pensaba en Zapala. Pensaba que su clima y su geografía ponían a prueba la voluntad de los habitantes, pero también que, como un dios algo sádico aunque benévolo, recompensaba su persistencia en querer habitarla con joyas naturales como el pozón del Covunco.

The Covunco pool is located 25 km from Zapala in a part of stream that flows through the territory of the Quinchao Mapuche community.
[…]
While I sat on the top of a strange rock perforated by time, I thought about Zapala. I thought its climate and geography tested the will of its inahbitants, but also that, just as a sadist though benevolent god, has rewarded people's persistency by populating it with natural jewels, as Covunco river pools.

Bottaro ends up his story inviting everyone to Neuquén, on the way to Caviahue, or South, on the way to San Martín de los Andes. Please, visit at least for one day the department of Zapala.

You can follow Wenceslao on Twitter.

This post was part of the sixth #LunesDeBlogsGV [Monday of blogs on GV] on June 9, 2014.

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