9 June 2012

Stories from 9 June 2012

India: Netizens Respond To Anonymous India's Protests

  9 June 2012

On 9th of June, 2012 Anonymous India organized gatherings across several Indian cities inviting netizens to join in protest against Internet censorship. Despite low turnout they seem to be able to gear up some sort of publicity. Netizens approved the peaceful protests but questioned Anonymous India's strategy of hacking websites.

Saudi Arabia: Protests to Free Detainees Held Without Trial

The kingdom of Saudi Arabia is believed to have thousands of detainees who were not allowed access to trials and many of them do not even know their charges. The families of detainees have been working the past months through social media to spread the word and have finally decided to take their cause to the street. Mona Kareem charts how one protest emerged on Twitter.

Africa: US Military Initiatives Lack Transparency

  9 June 2012

Cassidy identifies problems with US military initiatives in Africa:”Current military and counterterrorism initiatives in and assistance to many countries in Africa – and, in particular, those in East Africa – lack transparency and congressional oversight. Though sources at the National Defense University have, for example, estimated related assistance to Kenya...

Ethiopia: Father of Ethiopian Jazz Honored

  9 June 2012

“Ethiopian jazz giant Mulatu Astatke has been honored by the world-renowned Berklee College of Music. Mulatu, often dubbed as the father of Ethiopian jazz, was presented honorary doctor of music degree yesterday from the university’s president Roger H. Brown at 2012 commencement,” Arefe reports.

Living with HIV in Kazakhstan

On the Kazakh photo blog Vox Populi, Gulnar Bazhkenova presents a powerful photo essay [ru] with the stories of people living with HIV/AIDS in Kazakhstan. These individuals have decided to disclose their HIV status and show their faces in order to “send a message that they are normal people and that...

Tajikistan: Sharia Replaces Secular Law

Blogger Kayumars Ato writes [ru] that Sharia, or Islamic law, is gradually replacing secular law in Tajikistan. Excessive red tape and corruption in the country's courts increasingly lead Tajiks to consult Islamic leaders for guidance in disputes relating to marriage, divorce, and inheritance.

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