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Egypt: Watching the Tunisian Elections

This post is part of our special coverage for both the Egypt Revolution 2011 and Tunisian Revolution 2011.

The Tunisian revolution preceded the Egyptian one and since then, the Tunisians pursuit of democracy has been inspiring to the Egyptians. And now the Tunisians – inside and outside Tunisia – are busy with electing members of an assembly that will appoint a new government and then write a new constitution.

The polling station in the Tunisian embassy in Cairo. Photo taken by Nessryne Jelalia

The polling station in the Tunisian embassy in Cairo. Photo taken by Nessryne Jelalia

Those outside Tunisia, including those living in Egypt, started the voting process three days earlier than those inside Tunisia.

@SoniaElSakka: 20, 21,22 Oct Tunisian living abroad will vote around the world. 3 days of pride a dream we never believed could happen ta7ya [long live] Tunis #TNelec

Nessryne, a Tunisian living in Cairo, tweeted her feelings after voting for the first time in her life.

@nessryne: Such an emotional moment!! Cairo voting office is really cool and people are friendly but strict. #Egypt #TneElec

@nessryne: I need to calm down! I have to work today! Completely euphoric and HAPPY!!! #TneElec

Sonia El Sakka, another Tunisian in Egypt, wrote in her blog:

I voted ya Tunis :)
I did it … I finally voted … For the first time in my life what an amazing feeling of pride of happiness and of great hope for you my beautiful country … Praying for you to find the right path, Praying for my amazing Tunisian family, brothers and sisters to find our long awaited country the way we want it to be.
I am very optimistic very happy and no matter what many people think.

I Love You Tunisia the country of my birth, the country of my first smile, first word, first VOTE :)

Meanwhile, the Egyptians are watching the elections and expressing their happiness with it.

@esr_slam: مبروك تونس والله ساعدتي بيكم اليوم كأني كنت بصوت معاكم اليوم
@esr_slam: Congratulations to Tunisia, I swear I'm happy today as happy as if I am voting myself.
@AhmdAlish: في طريقي لسفارة تونس بالقاهرة لتهنئة المصوتين بالانتخابات
@AhmdAlish: On my way to the Tunisian Embassy in Cairo to congratulate the Tunisians voting there.

In both countries the opinion of each people about the other over the past 30 years was mostly based on their football rivalry. It is interesting to see how some Egyptians see Tunisia now, how some others used to have a different opinion earlier, and how visiting each others country has became an inspiring experience.

@btnafas7oria: لسه واخده بالى ان العلم الوحيد الى فى بيتى هو علم تونس …بكل حزم
@btnafas7oria: Just realized now that the only flag in my home is the Tunisian one … with all pride.
@kameldinho81: أنا كنت لا أحب تونس و لكن الآن تونس و مصر أيد واحدهة
@kameldinho81: I used to not like Tunisia, but now Tunisia and Egypt are both hand in hand.
@gogaegypt: يا تونس باعمل كل جهدي علشان اجيلك انا وبناتي في العيد
@gogaegypt: Oh Tunisia, I am doing my best to visit you with my daughters during Eid.

Being two of the older children of the so-called Arab Spring, many Egyptians have also started comparing how their post-revolution process is going to that in Tunisia.

@AmrKhairi: نجاح تونس التام في الانتقال لنظام محترم سيكون أكبر محفز للثورة في مصر، عشان الناس تفوق وتصحى م النوم
@AmrKhairi: The success of Tunisia in moving to a respected political system will be a catalyst for the Egyptian revolution, and for people to wake up.
@mohamedzezo92: فارق شاسع بين مسار الثورة في تونس ومسارها في مصر شئ مؤسف
@mohamedzezo92: There is a huge difference between the path the revolution in Tunisia is taking and that it's taking here in Egypt. It's a shame.

@mohamedzezo92: كنت أتمني أن مصر تبقي زي تونس وندعو لانتخاب جمعية تأسيسة لسن دستور جديد بس ع كل الأحوال تحية لأهل تونس

@mohamedzezo92: I wish we had an assembly here in Egypt to write a new constitution like in Tunisia, but anyhow I salute the Tunisian people.
@Abu_gamal: تونس بتنتخب … ربنا يسامح اللي قالوا نعم في الاستفتاء
@Abu_gamal: Tunisia is voting … May God forgive those who voted with yes in the referendum.

@MahmoudAboBakr: الناس اللى بتقول تونس احسن مننا والثورة هناك سبقت ثورة مصر، طيب وهو فيه كتاب او كتالوج بيحدد مراحل الثورة وشكلها

@MahmoudAboBakr: Those who are saying the situation in Tunisia is better than us, and that their revolution proceeded ours, do you have a handbook or a catalogue that defines a revolution and its stages?

Also it's a good chance to learn from the elections there, with the Egyptian elections around the corner.

@TravellerW: Are #Egypt-ians following the #Tunisia elections closely enough? From campaigning ideas to negative advertising, we must WATCH AND LEARN!!

And finally, despite the fact that they are both Arab-speaking countries, the language barrier sometimes stand in the way of those who want to follow the details of the events in Tunisia.

@EmanM: مش ممكن يا توانسة! اكتبوا بالعربي شوية وسيبكوا من الفرنساوي دة عشان نفهمكم، دة احنا حتى عرب زي بعض
@EmanM: I can't believe it Tunisians! Please write more in Arabic and stop using French for us to be able to understand you. We are both Arabs.

This post is part of our special coverage for both the Egypt Revolution 2011 and Tunisian Revolution 2011.

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