See all those languages up there? We translate Global Voices stories to make the world's citizen media available to everyone.

Learn more about Lingua Translation  »

Egypt: Scuffles Break Out Inside and Outside Mubarak Trial

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak stood trial yesterday for the killing of protesters in the Egyptian revolution. This is the third hearing of the trial and lasted for 10 hours, with scuffles reported both inside the court (which was off limits to cameras) and outside, where Mubarak's supporters clashed with the families of martyrs. The trial was adjourned until tomorrow. Several tweeps were outside the Cairo courthouse tweeting what was happening.

Mubarak, 83, is being tried along with his two sons, Alaa and Gamal, as well as former Interior Minister Habib Al Adly, who is accused of ordering the killing of the 850 protesters killed in the 18 days of the Egyptian uprising which started on January 25.

Tweeps standing outside the court were particularly disturbed with the brutal manner in which the families of martyrs were treated by the police.

Ali Hisham shares with us this photograph of a martyr's father being dragged out of court by security officers:

Police dragging the father of a martyr from Mubarak's trial. Photo from Twitpic by Ali Hisham

والد الشهيد محمد سليمان يتم سحله على الأرض من قبل قوات ” الأمن ” خارج قاعة محاكمة المخلوع

@Ali_Hisham: The father of martyr Mohammed Suleiman being dragged by security officers outside the court 

Video journalist Farah Saafan witnessed the incident and tweeted:

@FarahSaafan: While reporting from #MubarakTrial I tweeted abt an old man dragged on the ground & beaten w/sticks http://bit.ly/oBPjtd its him! Not my pic

After witnessing more such scuffles, Farah asks:

@FarahSaafan: Does anyone know where I can buy a safety helmet? Not the motorbikes helmet, the safety helmet for work sites or that Journalists wear!

And Ahmed Al Ish advises:

@AhmdAlish: اللى هبحضر محاكمة المخلوع يوم الأربع يشترى خوذة بلاستيك من محلات الأمن الصناعى فى شارع الجمهورية بخمسه جنيه. ريتويت فى الخير

@AhmdAlish
: Whoever is coming to the ousted president's trial on Wednesday should first buy a plastic helmet from the industrial safety shops on Gomhoriya Street for five pounds.

Lawyer Gamal Eid, who attended the trial and runs the Arabic Network for Human Rights Information (ANHRI), notes (Ar):

@gamaleid: النيابة خدعت الشعب المصري وقدمت شهود اثبات يبرؤا السفاحين بدلا من ادانتهم. النيابة العامة لا تمثل الشعب .مناخ قرف واحباط
@gamaleid: The public prosecution duped the Egyptian people and presented witnesses who would make murderers become innocent instead of charging them. The public prosecutor does not represent the people. The situation is disgusting and demoralising

Editor and presenter Yosri Fouda sarcastically adds [ar]:

@YosriFouda: في الجلسة القادمة: ميدان التحرير هو اللي نط فوق الجامعة الأمريكية و قتل مبارك والعادلي و ٨٠٠ فرد أمن
@YosriFouda: At the next trial, it would be Tahrir Square that pounced on the American University and killed Mubarak and Adly and 800 members of the security forces

Heba Farooq reacts:

@HebaFarooq: key witnesses in Mubarak murder trial change testimony | Al-Masry Al-Youm And that's the only #change we have so far! #mubarakTrial #egypt

And Shams Karim adds:

@Shams209: Just read that lots of shoes found in the court room, I guess that's why #Mubarak is in the cage.:) ♫ #MubarakTrial

Reporters at the hearing say that lawyers threw shoes at each other during the trial.

Mubarak's trial will resume tomorrow, Wednesday (September 7). Follow reactions on Twitter on the hashtag #MubarakTrial

This post is part of our special coverage Egypt Revolution 2011.

Start the conversation

Authors, please log in »

Guidelines

  • All comments are reviewed by a moderator. Do not submit your comment more than once or it may be identified as spam.
  • Please treat others with respect. Comments containing hate speech, obscenity, and personal attacks will not be approved.

Receive great stories from around the world directly in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the best of Global Voices
* = required field
Email Frequency



No thanks, show me the site