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Uganda: Walk to Work Protests in Photos

This post is part of our special coverage Uganda: Walk to Work Protests.

Ugandans are taking to the streets to protest rising fuel and food prices and rapid inflation in the so-called Walk to Work protests, named after a handful of opposition leaders who were arrested back in April as they walked to work in solidarity with those who can no longer afford to take public transportation.

Police have been using pink paint, tear gas and live bullets against the protesters. Here is the story of walk to work protests in photos.

Why are Kenyans and Tanzanians not protesting?

This is the reason why Ugandans are the only ones protesting food  prices in the region. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @mugumya.

This is the reason why Ugandans are the only ones protesting food prices in the region. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @mugumya.

Journalists are not safe:

Journalist Micheal Kakumirizi was targeted by Uganda Security Forces while covering #walk2work protest. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @no_dictatorship.

Journalist Micheal Kakumirizi was targeted by Uganda Security Forces while covering #walk2work protest. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @no_dictatorship.

Walk to work, then run for your life:

Uganda police in action. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @no_dictatorship.

Uganda police in action. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @no_dictatorship.

Have citizens become wild animals?:

Uganda Army hunting Ugandans. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @no_dictatorship.

Uganda Army hunting Ugandans. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @no_dictatorship.

Hunger strike for a just cause:

Makerere area councillor Mr Bernard Luyiga went on hunger strike to protest police brutality. he camped outside Makerere University. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @pjkanywa.

Makerere area councillor Mr Bernard Luyiga went on hunger strike to protest police brutality. he camped outside Makerere University. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @pjkanywa.

Women deserve respect:

Ugandan women telling police to respect women's bodies during arrest. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @vote4africa.

Ugandan women telling police to respect women's bodies during arrest. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @vote4africa.

I will sleep here until police respect human rights, says Makerere area councillor:

Hunger strike against police brutality. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @pjkanywa.

Hunger strike against police brutality. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @pjkanywa.

Police don't recognise your freedom of movement:

Police in Kampala blocking peaceful demonstrators. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @vote4africa.

Police in Kampala blocking peaceful demonstrators. Photo courtesy of Twitter user @vote4africa.

Ugandan police have been using excessive force against citizens taking part in the walk to work protests. But guess who was seeing walking to work

@elijahbee says: guess who I saw walking to work this morning

@elijahbee says: guess who I saw walking to work this morning

In conclusion, read Echwalu's post titled “When Cameras Lied to the Country.”

This post is part of our special coverage Uganda: Walk to Work Protests.

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