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Global Blogging Competition on Water Issues

The European Journalism Centre has launched a three month international blogging competition focusing on water issues called TH!NK5. Bloggers from 40 different countries joined the contest, aiming to win the final prize: a trip to Lisbon, Portugal.

As the Th!nk About It site describes:

TH!NK ABOUT IT is a series of blogging competitions organised by the European Journalism Centre. The competitions are aimed at professional and aspiring journalists and new media creators from a diverse range of backgrounds. TH!NK aims to provide an online platform for coverage of a timely topic, establishing an international community of bloggers in the process. The first TH!NK edition in 2009 concentrated on the European parliamentary elections, with subsequent editions focusing on global topics such as climate change and global development.

Th!nk About it Blogging Competition

Here are some of the most popular and original posts written by some of the winners:

On the post “The Usual Question: Faucet or Bottled Water?”, Brazilian blogger Diego Lobo talks about water markets and his personal experience with bottled water.

Blogger Iris Gonzales from the Philippines wrote “Wait! My Water Bag Broke!“, a post where she discusses water through a maternal perspective.

Larisa Rankovic from Serbia posted “Dam on Danube and the End of Communism”, a historical text telling the story of a dam that was becoming a focus for opposition of the Hungarian regime.

Blogger and film maker Peter Vadocz from Hungary uploaded a short movie he made on the topic called “Spiagga/ Beach”. The author defines it as “a picture dictionary for 4-6 years old kids on the beach.”

Author Andrea Arzaba participated in the blogging competition. In one of her posts she wrote about water as a character: “What if Water Could SPEAK!?

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