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Iran: Bloggers React to the Death of Bin Laden

This post is part of our special coverage The Death of Osama Bin Laden.

Several Iranian bloggers have reacted to the death of Osama Bin Laden. Some with serious remarks, a few with questions and some with irony.

Iranian blogger Machin Hesab asks [fa] why they shot him in the head.

Mohmmad Moini writes [fa] that Bin Laden symbolizes a thought, and that the death of Osama does not mean his ideas are dead. An idea that does not like human beings, and uses religion as an instrument. For Bin Laden only his own reading (interpretation) of religion was legitimate, but he should have doubted his ideas before getting killed.

Several bloggers such as Azarkhan published Osama's photo (above) with his family in Sweden in 1971, showing a different, younger Osama (circled in red).

Several bloggers such as Azarkhan published Osama's photo (above) with his family in Sweden in 1971, showing a different, younger Osama (circled in red).

A user of Balatarin, a popular Iranian link sharing site, published a [fake] photo and said as a joke, “Now the municipality in Tehran will rename Ladan street to Martyr Bin Ladan.”

Ladan street, Tehran, Iran.

Ladan street, Tehran, Iran.

Floret, another Balatarin user, writes [fa] that it is time for Iranian people to celebrate Osama's death in the streets of Iran.

Uniirani writes [fa] that now that Bin Laden has died the world has one less evil person in it. He calls him a “real terrorist”.

This post is part of our special coverage The Death of Osama Bin Laden.

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