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France: Demonstration in Paris Against Gabon Dictatorship

This post is part of our special coverage of Gabon Unrest 2011.

The small West African country of Gabon has been experiencing weeks of political tension, as two governments – official and unofficial – have both lain claim to the presidency. On Sunday 27 February, 2011, self-proclaimed unofficial president André Mba Obame left [fr] the United Nations Development Programme building in capital Libreville, where he had been taking refuge.

The day before, 7,000 people [fr] gathered in the streets of French capital Paris to demonstrate against African dictators and the French government's alleged collusion with African dictatorial regimes.

Protesters left from Place de la République and headed to the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, via 51 rue de l'Université, where Ali Bongo Ondimba (current official Gabonese president) owns a 140 million Euro mansion.

Both Gabonese and Libyan activists were present in the procession.

Procession of protestors against dictatorships in Africa passing near the Louvres Museum in Paris, France on 26 February, 2011. Image by author.

Procession of protestors against dictatorships in Africa passing near the Louvres Museum in Paris, France on 26 February, 2011. Image by author.

Gabonese activists demonstrating against official Gabon President Ali Bongo in Paris, France on February 26, 2011. Image by author.

Gabonese activists demonstrating against official Gabon President Ali Bongo in Paris, France on February 26, 2011. Image by author.

While passing in front of President Ali Bongo's property, the procession paused to allow protestors to shout “Ali Bongo Dégage” (“Ali Bongo must go”), as show in this Youtube video by user AfricaWeWish:

This post is part of our special coverage of Gabon Unrest 2011.

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